Davie's 85-05 middleweight era thread

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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December started with Bernard Hopkins giving Antwun Echols another shot



1. 10-9 Hopkins. Good start from Hopkins. Starts off scoring well leaping in with the left hook, Starts to rough Echols up a bit and turns it into a bit of a brawl, some hitting after the break hitting after the bell. He has Echols riled

2. 10-9 Hopkins big drama here, Hopkins slightly ahead in the round he turns Echols around after a bit of wrestling and punches him in the back of the head, blatant foul. Bernard turned him round and Bernard knew what he was doing striking him over the back of the ear with his back turned. There should have been a point deduction and 5 minutes rest. Having said all that I strongly suspect there was a lot of play acting going on, Echols had his eyes dramatically rolling back in his head, wobbling around like he could barely stand, and clearly describes what happened to the ref. His head quickly clears as he's asked to fight on.

3. 9-10 Echols. Quieter round that seemed to suit Echols who was able to pick spots and made Hopkins miss in what was an unusually inaccurate round for Bernard. Nice exchange near the ropes close to the end of the round which Echols appeared to get the upper hand in

4. 10-9 Hopkins. He hurts Echols on a couple of occasions here. But again he trurns Echols around at one point, he reaches round and hits him, so a legal shot and Echols should protect himself at all times but when Hopkins has intentionally turned him round and got behind him it's pretty dodgy

5. 10-9 Hopkins. Echols getting out of position a lot, getting off balanced and turned round and Hopkins never misses an opportunity to capitalise on these situations where he sees an opening, nothing illegal about these, all legit punching opportunities. Very good at rolling low to his right as Echols reaches with the right hand and Hopkins pops back up with a l short right uppercut.

6. 10-7 Hopkins Echols slams Hopkins to the canvas, Hopkins makes a huge deal out of it making out he's dislocated his shoulder, in fairness he doesn't throw a right hand for the remainder of that round, Will be interesting to see if he starts throwing it as the fight goes on. 2 points taken from Echols. He fights 5 months later vs Holmes, so there was no prolonged lay off.

7. 10-8 Hopkins. There's fuck all wrong with that right shoulder :lol: . 5 of his first 7 shots in this round are right hands. Half way through he rocks Echols with a combination of lefts and right and he scores a knock down by punching Echols right through the ropes with a fucking right hand. What a chancer

8. 9-9 Hopkins. Point deducted for holding behind the head. Bernard scores the lead right, the one two, the counter right, hard shots hooked shots, body shots you name it, if you can score a right hand Bernard Hopkins has landed it this round.

9. 10-9 Hopkins. It's a shame, there's so much good stuff that happens in this round but the talking points are Hopkins getting away with a rabbit punch (which admitedly he did take the sting out of at the last second) and is warned for holding and hitting. Just needs to add an obvious low blow and we have the fiull set.

10. TKO. Hopkins. He hurts him early on and goes in for the kill, Weeks splits them and Hopkins appears to throw himself down, not sure if he was looking for a point to be deducted from the ref. Cristiano Ronaldo would be embarassed with some of these antics. He hurts him again later in the round and the final shot an uppercut seems to leave him defenceless, Weeks splits them to have a look at Echols....Echols clearly thinking he's being checked over by the ref just maintains eye contact with him, Weeks takes a little step back, makes no signal to box and allows Bernard a pot shot at him. Another barrage from Hopkins convinces Weeks to stop it.

What a fucking shambles of a fight
88-79 Bernard Hopkins.

The fouling and dirty fighting is getting worse as I progress through his middleweight title reign. The complaining to the ref over every little thing, the play acting and laying it on thick would be embarrasing for an Italian football player let alone a seasoned world champion level boxer and to add insult, Tony Weeks has a shamble and it';s not the first time a ref has had a stinker dealing with this shit.
Add in that we have other fighters in against Bernard, knowing what they are up against, intentionally fouling and being instructed by their corners to fight dirty, we have other fighters matching his ham acting routine and all together it is making Hopkins fight one shambles after another.

At least we didn't have big George talking shite.,
 
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Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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William Joppy made his next defence to Jonathan Reid on the undercard of Felix Trinidad vs Fernando Vargas.
This then sets up a 2001 Trinidad win over Joppy before facing Hopkins



Might as well cover the Trinidad fight to give us a little context.


1. 10-9 Joppy. Straight into it landing with either hand and working away steadily. Not loading up oin anything or trying to hurt him but trying things and testing different looks, pleanty of jabs to head and body. Reid trying to ease his way in to things with the jab but not really able to set anything up.

2. 10-9 Joppy as Joppy starts with the rapid jabs, Reid gets to him a couple times with the left hook, So Joppy really gets on the front foot, lands the right with a little too much ease a couple times then starts mixing things up a little. When he works he is the far superior operator, comfortable in there.

3. 10-8 Joppy. Reid lands the best shot of the fight early on with a good right hand but again once Jopppy gets into his rhythm he';s a really fluid and natural looking boxer. He sets up a lovely right hand right across Reids jaw that hurts him and a few shots later he's down. Tries his best to get him out of there in the last 30 seconds but can't quite do enough with the ref intently looking on

4. KO Joppy. Again he starts slow, lets Reid into the round, Reid starts with 2 good right hands, a nice left hook before Joppy gets in his rhythm but when he does it's one way traffic and Reid just goes ion the pure defensive, not throwing and eventually getting hurt as Joppy can do as he pleases. Nice finish for Joppy as the ref was just preparing to step in. Joppy starts it with a left to the body and a right over the top that the commentary highlighted a number of times and that's what hurts him here, from there it's a two handed assault until his legs give way.

Impressed again with Joppy but there is that concern now the way he eased his way into rounds and got tagged. But from there he was dominant and hurtful and the punch stats paint a worrying picture with Joppy landing twice as much as Reid threw

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Davie

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2001 is an interesting year, probably the most important in the 95-05 period.
We get two unifications and the creation of th super world middleweight title from the WBA, allowing Joppy to lose his title and then just get the ordinary version back when the championship is upgraded.
The 2001 middleweight tournament brought together the very best of the 160lb division


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Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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First up way Bernard Hopkins (IBF) vs Keith Holmes (WBC) on April 14th 2001




JabsHopkinsHolmes
Total PunchesHopkinsHolmes
Landed26186
Thrown544354
Pct.48%24%
Landed340
Thrown72225
Pct.4%18%
Bernard Hopkins 159 lbs beat Keith Holmes 157 lbs by UD in round 12 of 12
Notes

  • This fight marked the first round of the 2001 Middleweight Unification Tournament.
  • Hopkins entered the tournament as the IBF Middleweight Champion, and Holmes was the WBC Middleweight Champion.
  • The New York Times reported:
    • Hopkins controlled Saturday's fight from the third round, winning easily on all three judges' scorecards. There were no knockdowns, but Hopkins dictated the action with a sustained body attack and rattled Holmes several times with punches to the head. The biggest problem for Hopkins on Saturday was avoiding hitting Holmes with low blows. Hopkins complained before the fight that Holmes wore his trunks too high, and his concern about being penalized for low blows proved to be valid. With 48 seconds left in the fifth round, a point was taken from Hopkins for a low blow, and on two other occasions, timeouts were given to Holmes after he complained of low blows. In Hopkins's mind, Holmes wearing his trunks high made it difficult to avoid hitting him below the belt. "The guy had turtleneck trunks on," Hopkins said. "If a man brings a turtleneck into the ring, what are you going to do? Maybe one or two of the blows were low, but they weren't intentional. I couldn't let it bother my game plan."
  • After 11 rounds, HBO's unofficial judge Harold Lederman's scorecard had Hopkins up 109-99. [3]

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Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Next up was William Joppy defending his WBA title against unified 154lb champion Felix Trinidad



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"20 Years Later: The Peak of Tito Mania – Felix Trinidad vs. William Joppy
Posted on 05/12/2021​
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“Tito Trinidad may be the deadliest puncher in these divisions since Ray Robinson.” – Larry Merchant​
20 years ago, on May 12, 2001, at Madison Square Garden, the second half of Don King’s middleweight world championship tournament took place when Puerto Rico’s Felix “Tito” Trinidad (42-3, 35 KOs) faced off against William Joppy (40-7-2, 30 KOs) for his WBA middleweight title.​
Trinidad, 28, entered the fight with a record of 39-0 with 30 knockouts, and Joppy, 30, came in with a record 32-1-1 with 24 knockouts.​
The tournament would crown boxing’s first undisputed middleweight champion since Marvin Hagler.​
Longtime reigning IBF middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins had taken care of business in the first bout of the tournament, winning a wide unanimous decision over Keith Holmes to unify the WBC and IBF titles.​
Trinidad was coming off of the most prominent year of his career in 2000, where he moved up from welterweight to junior middleweight and unified the WBA and IBF titles scoring significant victories over David Reid and Fernando Vargas.​
The bout with Vargas is regarded as one of the best in the history of the junior middleweight division and led to Trinidad being awarded Fighter of the Year honors for the year 2000. Trinidad’s father, Felix Trinidad Sr., also earned the Trainer of the Year award to put a cap on a spectacular year.​
Trinidad’s move up in weight was an attempt to make history to become one of just a handful of fighters to hold titles in the welterweight and middleweight divisions.​
Some of the greatest fighters in the sport’s history had held titles at welterweight and middleweight, including Ray Robinson, Ray Leonard, Thomas Hearns, and Emile Griffith.​
By defeating Joppy, Trinidad would become the first fighter since Ray Leonard to win a middleweight title in his first fight at the weight class.​
“My goal is to win the 160-pound middleweight crown on May 12 against William Joppy and then go on to unify the title by beating Bernard Hopkins,” Trinidad stated through a translator for an HBO preview show promoting the bout with Joppy. “I know that I’m fighting against boxers who are perhaps more powerful who may hit harder, but I’d like to tell them all, Joppy and then Hopkins, to watch out for me because I really want to win.​
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“I really want to knock them out, and I’m certain that when they feel my punch, they will know who Tito Trinidad is. They’re going to find out where my middleweight punch is, I guarantee it.”​
During this time, Trinidad was the most popular boxer out of the island of Puerto Rico. Similar to fighters like Manny Pacquiao or Ricky Hatton, he fought with the weight of a country behind him that brought more meaning every time he stepped inside the squared circle.​
In the early 2000s, the pound-for-pound list was a round-robin between Trinidad, Shane Mosley, and Roy Jones Jr.​
As the longest-reigning champion in welterweight history, having made 15 title defenses holding victories over Oscar De La Hoya, Pernel Whitaker, Oba Carr, Yory Boy Campas among others, and then moving up to unify at junior middleweight, Trinidad had as a good a case as anyone for the pound-for-pound crown.​
“Felix has the qualities of an idol and celebrity, but also and most importantly the qualities of a hero that merits an example to the young and all the people,” stated Trinidad’s then-attorney Jose Nicolas Medina. “ We have great champions that have been champions in one category. He is the first number one pound-for-pound in the whole sport.”​
Trinidad’s opponent, Joppy, was the ultimate underdog heading into the fight. His career trajectory mirrored some of today’s fighters, such as Demetrius Andrade, as a world champion who was looking for his opportunity to prove himself against the best.​
Joppy started boxing at the age of 20, the same age that Trinidad won his first world title at welterweight. He would get his first title opportunity by traveling to Japan and stopping Shinji Takehara via a ninth-round stoppage to win the WBA middleweight title.​
Joppy would make two defenses before losing the title by controversial decision to the Dominican Republic’s Julio Cesar Green in August 1997. The Virginia native would get his revenge on Green a few months later in January 1998, winning a dominant unanimous decision in a rematch.​
In January 1999, tragedy struck Joppy when an auto accident broke c7 vertebrae in his neck, leaving him out of the ring for most of the year.​
Miraculously, Joppy would return in the summer of 1999 and would go on to make five defenses in his second reign, even scoring a seventh-round stoppage over Green in a rubber match.​
For Joppy, the fight with Trinidad was his opportunity to become a household name and earn bigger paydays. More importantly, the Trinidad fight represented a chance at recognition and notoriety.​
“This is my great fight,” Joppy stated during an HBO interview promoting the fight. “This is going to get me over that hump. This is going to put me on that pound-for-pound list. This is my dream come true. I know that Trinidad is the house fighter, but I’m going to shock the world.”​
Having been a career-long middleweight, Joppy felt that he would be able to handle Trinidad, who spent most of his career at welterweight.​
“Trinidad can not deal with me,” Joppy said during one of the final press conferences. “Him beating Vargas and David Reid, they were still babies. He’s dealing with a veteran now. Welcome to the middleweights, Trinidad.​
“I’m going to show him things he’s never seen before.”​
Heading into the fight with an outstanding record of 19-0 with 15 knockouts in world title fights, Trinidad didn’t lack confidence in facing Joppy.​
“Well, he should go ahead and try to back me up,” said Trinidad. “And then do whatever he’s been saying he’s going to do. Once we’re in the ring, I will show him. He might want to do what he said, but whether I let him do it or not is another matter.​
“Let’s see on May 12 if he can do a fraction of what he said he’s going to do.”​
The stage was set in front of the pro-Puerto Rican crowd at Madison Square Garden in one of the greatest atmospheres boxing has seen.​
Ring Magazine’s Editor-in-Chief Doug Fischer and former ESPN Senior Writer Dan Rafael described the atmosphere as electric and one of the best crowds for a fight that they have attended.​
When Trinidad made his entrance, the crowd went into a frenzy, with loud chants of Tito reverberating throughout the arena. Trinidad basked in the roar of the crowd as a fighter who loved the adulation he received from his fans.​
The fight began with Joppy taking the initiative heading straight out to Trinidad. However, this proved to be a vital mistake, as Joppy’s lack of focus on defense would prove to be his downfall.​
With 48 seconds remaining in the first round, Joppy left his hands down by his waist, and Trinidad took immediate advantage by landing a quick left hook that stunned the Virginia fighter.​
Another left hook and right hand followed, putting Joppy down hard on the canvas. He was able to get up to wobbly legs with the bell saving him from further punishment.​
Joppy’s corner was in a panic, leaving him standing in his corner while yelling instructions. But, the middleweight champion’s resolve and high activity level kept him in the fight.​
The second round was a showcase for Trinidad’s accuracy as he landed 29 out of 49 punches at a 59 percent connect rate. But Joppy kept throwing punches in an attempt to overwhelm the Puerto Rican.​
Joppy’s most effective round came in the third when he threw a record 116 punches, the most ever thrown against Trinidad in a fight tracked by CompuBox.​
Trinidad’s power was on full display against Joppy. But, the fight highlighted some of his often-overlooked attributes in finding and taking advantage of openings and his overall accuracy.​
In the first minute of the fourth round, Trinidad caught Joppy with a left hook while his hands were down, causing him to roll over on the canvas from another knockdown.​
Joppy somehow managed to survive the round, but the end seemed imminent.​
In the fifth round, Trinidad landed a pair of right hands on the inside after creating space. The first right landed, and as Joppy was swaying down, Trinidad landed another brutal right hand. Joppy attempted to get up on wobbly legs forcing referee Arthur Mercante Jr. to stop the fight at the 2:25 mark.​
The Puerto Rican landed an unbelievable 108 out of 191 total punches at a 57 percent rate, with 80 of those punches being power shots.​
Trinidad, now holding the WBA middleweight title as a three-division champion, stood tall as arguably the best in the world. One can argue if Trinidad was indeed the greatest fighter to come out of Puerto Rico, but his popularity could not be questioned.​
While fighters like Carlos Ortiz, Wilfredo Gomez, Wilfred Benitez may have fought in more revered eras, they never peaked at the zenith that Trinidad reached.​
Trinidad’s run from 1999 to 2001 was a short one, but the significance of that period would be what other Puerto Rican fighters would be measured by from that point forward.​
In September 2001, the run would come to an end at the hands of Bernard Hopkins in the finals of the middleweight tournament.​
The pressure in which Trinidad put on his opponents could only be compared to the pressure he felt having to fight with the weight and emotions of an entire country.​
For the night of May 12, 2001, at the world’s most famous arena, Felix Trinidad and Puerto Rico were at the top of the boxing world."​
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Saturday 29th, September 2001. WBC, IBF & the newly created WBA super world middleweight titles on the line.
Bernard 'The Executioner' Hopkins vs Felix 'Tito' Trinidad.




Bernard Hopkins vs. Felix Trinidad
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Hopkins drops Trinidad in the 12th round.
Felix Trinidad 159 lbs lost to Bernard Hopkins 157 lbs by TKO at 1:18 in round 12 of 12

Notes
Felix Trinidad vs. Bernard Hopkins (poster).jpg
  • The fight was originally scheduled for September 15, 2001, but it was postponed due to the September 11th terrorist attacks.
  • Final of The Middleweight World Championship Series.
  • Trinidad was a 2 to 1 betting favorite.
  • Hopkins dropped Trinidad with a right in the 12th round.
  • Trinidad's trainer, Felix Trinidad Sr., came into the ring and stopped the fight.
  • Trinidad earned $9 million, and Hopkins earned $2.5 million.
  • The fight generated 475,000 pay-per-view buys and $20.4 million in PPV revenue. [1] [2]
  • Round 10 was named The Ring Magazine Round of the Year for 2001.



" Hopkins is undisputed middleweight champ​
Associated Press​
NEW YORK -- Felix Trinidad made a judgment of Bernard Hopkins in the first round, and it was wrong. Really wrong.
He's nothing, I got him," Trinidad told his father-trainer at the end of the opening round.​
But 11 rounds later, Trinidad was a beaten fighter for the first time in his career, and the 36-year-old Hopkins was the undisputed middleweight champion.​
Hopkins knocked down Trinidad and stopped him at 1:22 of the final round early Sunday before a screaming but shocked crowd of 19,075 in Madison Square Garden.​
"I wanted to show my greatness, and I think I did -- halfway," Hopkins said. "I'm not great yet, but I will be. Nobody can stand up to me."​
If Hopkins doesn't consider himself a great fighter, anybody who watched him against Trinidad would have to judge this a great performance.​
He dominated the second half of the fight, rocking Trinidad several times and then knocking him down with a crunching right. Trinidad struggled up at 9 and as referee Steve Smoger looked at him, the fighter's father climbed into the ring to stop it.​
It was Trinidad's first loss in 41 professional fights and the first defeat in 21 championship fights for the 28-year-old Puerto Rican, who is a former welterweight and super welterweight champion.​
Trinidad went into the ring in search of not only the title, but of a knockout victory over an opponent who had twice thrown down the Puerto Rican flag in pre-fight news conferences. He didn't come close to his 34th knockout.​
Hopkins, a champion since 1995, went into the ring with the WBC and IBF middleweight titles and added the WBA championship. He also fought his way out from under the shadows of Trinidad and fighters such as Oscar de la Hoya and Roy Jones. Jr.​
Before the fight, a member of Hopkins' camp claimed Trinidad's right hand was wrapped illegally. Trinidad complained, but did have the hand rewrapped.​
Trinidad entered the ring pumped up, while Hopkins, a Philadelphian who bills himself as "The Executioner", wore a red-hooded mask and remained calm. Hopkins also had stenciled on his back "Golden Palace.com" for a Costa Rica casino which paid him $100,000, which he bet on himself as the underdog.​
"He's a great fighter," Trinidad said. "I thought the fight was even until the end."​
One judge had Hopkins ahead 109-100 after 11 rounds, and the other two each had it 107-102.​
The AP card favored Hopkins 108-101.​
A CompuBox punch analysis credited Hopkins with landing 260 of 653 punches and Trinidad 129 of 329.​
After he realized he won, Hopkins jumped up on the ropes in a neutral corner and chanted, "U-S-A, U-S-A. He then embraced Trinidad and said, "I want to tell you and your Puerto Rican fans that there was nothing personal about the flag."​
Hopkins (40-2-1, 29 knockouts) also said he would go to Puerto Rico and talk to the people. He also talked about giving Trinidad a rematch.​
Hopkins fought a brilliant fight. He gave Trinidad lots of movement, stiff jabs and, when Trinidad tried to attack, Hopkins simply outgunned him with both hands to the body and head.​
While Hopkins' victory might have been unexpected, it was also one-sided. He dominated the last six rounds and had Trinidad in all kinds of trouble.​
In the sixth round, Trinidad landed several shots in what was the best round of the fight. The two men went toe-to-toe on several occasions, with Trinidad having the best of it most often.​
He ended the round with three or four shots to the head.​
It was Trinidad's last hurrah.​
Hopkins' strength began to come to the fore in the second half of the fight. He landed several good head shots in the seventh, eighth and ninth rounds, and had Trinidad wobbly on occasion.​
Then in the 10th, Hopkins drove Trinidad around the ring, and just before the bell he landed a tremendous right to the head that had Trinidad tottering. At the bell, Trinidad wobbled back to his corner.​
Hopkins, who weighed 157 pounds to 158{ for Trinidad, continued to dish out punishment in the 11th round and then finished it at 1:22 of the 12th.​
The victory gave Hopkins a 14-1-1 record with 10 knockouts in championship matches. Trinidad's loss snapped a streak of 20 victories, 17 by knockout, in championship bouts.​
Hopkins earned $2.5 million with a victory that will earn him much more, while Trinidad earned $9 million.​
The fight originally was scheduled for Sept. 15, but was postponed for two weeks after the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.​
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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17th November 2001.
William Joppy, having just lost his WBA crown to Felix Trinidad, gets the chance to regain his "WBA world championship" against Howard Eastman, due to Hopkins being elevated to super champion having unified against Trinidad. What we all now know as the second rate odinary title was born.



Interestingly, it happened on the Lewis vs Rahman rematch undercard.
Any excuse Davie, any excuse.

 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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WBO super welterweight champion Harry Simon, stepped up and faced our man Hacine Cherifi, for the interim WBO middleweight title. He would face the reigning champion Armand Krajnc in the following year.


Armand Krajnc rounded the year off with a win over Paolo Roberto to defend his WBO title.

Krajnc likes posting tiny little bits of his fights on his youtube channel.

https://youtu.be/4xTQV9ToAgM
https://youtu.be/Tbzq5XTZGks
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Again, there's some relevance to the middle weight scene with both of these guys involved in the 160lb title scene in coming years, but really it's just an excuse to watch fights I haven't seen in a while


Felix Trinidad vs Oscar De La Hoya

1. 9-10 ODLH. Trinidad jabbing Oscars gloves as Oscar moved outside, nice and light on his feet. Oscar jumped in with left hooks and a couple of flurries, some certainly landed, albeit light contact, they were scoring shots.

2. 10-9 Trinidad. Very close round, Trinidad landing a couple left hooks midround and Oscar trying to nick it late and getting through with the right hand once or twice, not a lot landing completely flush as both fighting cautiously

3. 9-10 ODLH. Still bouncing around, still very tentative in the early part of the round where Trinidad scoed a left hook to the head and one to the body. But Oscar turns it on in the last minute showing good hand speed in combination, he starts jabbing and watches Tito's movement and sets him up for an uppercut. Clever stuff from Oscar

4. 10-9 Trinidad. Prefer his hard straight jab to Oscars fast one. Certainly as a scoring shot anyway. Oscar did land a really nice solid left hook to the body but Felix got in with a couple right hands late to nick it. These are tough to score

5. 9-10 ODLH. Oscar keeps trying to push out a fast right like a jab trying to set the left hookbut it doesn't really come off, But he throws the one two followed by the left hook and all 3 shots land for the best combination of the fight. He scors another two handed assault late in the round

6. 9-10 OLDH. Very close round with Trinidad scoring a couple clean single shots early on but he's struggling with the lateral movement of De La Hoya. Oscar throws those fast combinations again, landing a few decent shots in amongst it. Jim Lampley having a fucking mare calling this though, he's calling "hard shot lands for Oscar" far too often for my liking

7. 10-9 Trinidad. I thought he got the left hook through again but I would like to see Tito put 3 or 4 shots together at times. Oscar blatantly trying to steal the round late again and Jim calling the right hand through the middle again that didn't seem to land at all.

8. 9-10 ODLH. Good round for Oscar. Moves left and right, gets off quick combinations and gets on the move again. Gets the right hand to Trinidad's chin effectively. But I still maintain they are crediting Oscar with more success than he is having and simply not mentioning some of the single shots Felix scores. Judges have it 77-75, 77-76, 77-75. I agree with the judges not Lampley and co.

9. 10-9 Trinidad. Another very close one. Oscar started with a couple really flashy fast flurries. Trinidad catches up with him through the mid round, scoring heavier shots before Oscar came on late again.
Lampley again commenting on Tito's shots being partially blocked but NEVER mentions De La Hoya shots that don't find the target. Merchant at the end states that Oscar caught more punches than in previous rounds but the more dramatic punches were landed by him, again not the case.

10. 10-9 Trinidad. Clear Trinidad round, scored single shots although not all landed clean he was the only person punching for the first 2 minutes. Oscar starts flurrying at the 10 second clapper.

11. 10-9 Trinidad. Oscar ran, But didn't throw enough to get the respect of a man who was looking for the knock out. Felix threw more, landed more and landed the more powerful shots. Oscar lands his first meaningful shot with 30 seconds left and Lampley basically roars with excitement.
I have Trinidad a round up.

12. 10-9 Trinidad. Oscar on the move again, the way he moved side to side he was alway pretty much square on so when he did throw, with left or right, they were throws as fast light jabs. Trinidad the only man looking to fight and turned Oscars head with a few shots, Oscar did a weird thing on a few occasions where he kept his head turned after the shot almost to emphasise he'd been hit.

115-113 Felix Trinidad
Oscar boxed well first half and his movement was too much for Trinidad. He picked his spots to throw fast shots, his jab was very good at stopping Trinidad set himself and his right hand did get through albeit he was more focused on speed and scoring points than power and hurting shots.
Tito took over second half and I think it was a combination of him throwing caution to the wind, closing the ring better and Oscar not retuning fire.
I don't think Oscars feet slowed any but Trinidad was able to close him down as he was less concerned about what was coming back.
I liked Ledermans card, he had it a draw and I think we disagreed on 3 rounds but each of those I could see it going the other way, they were close. I think I scored it to Oscar last time I viewed it and could make a case for that just going over the tight rounds on my card but for me he gave too much away in those last 4 and I'd struggle not to find another 2 rounds to Felix in the first 8.
The commentary was on a par with the Pacquaio vs Bradley fight that @TFG highlighted a while back for outrageously biased commentary from Jim Lampley, it was wild. George and Merchant got dragged into it a little but appeared to want to remain objective and Lederman flat out told him he was talking shit when he revealed his final card. I can easily how fans would be swayed when scoring this

Looking at some of these as an example, theres a lot of wide Oscar rounds by 6, 7 and even 8 rounds.
Two cards on there give Oscar the first 10 rounds to score 118-110, that's just mental and can only be explained by being hypnotised by Jim Lampleys voice


@turbotime you're a De La Hoya fan, I know the consensus is he should have won it. How did you score this one?
 
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Felix Trinidad vs Oscar De La Hoya

1. 9-10 ODLH. Trinidad jabbing Oscars gloves as Oscar moved outside, nice and light on his feet. Oscar jumped in with left hooks and a couple of flurries, some certainly landed, albeit light contact, they were scoring shots.

2. 10-9 Trinidad. Very close round, Trinidad landing a couple left hooks midround and Oscar trying to nick it late and getting through with the right hand once or twice, not a lot landing completely flush as both fighting cautiously

3. 9-10 ODLH. Still bouncing around, still very tentative in the early part of the round where Trinidad scoed a left hook to the head and one to the body. But Oscar turns it on in the last minute showing good hand speed in combination, he starts jabbing and watches Tito's movement and sets him up for an uppercut. Clever stuff from Oscar

4. 10-9 Trinidad. Prefer his hard straight jab to Oscars fast one. Certainly as a scoring shot anyway. Oscar did land a really nice solid left hook to the body but Felix got in with a couple right hands late to nick it. These are tough to score

5. 9-10 ODLH. Oscar keeps trying to push out a fast right like a jab trying to set the left hookbut it doesn't really come off, But he throws the one two followed by the left hook and all 3 shots land for the best combination of the fight. He scors another two handed assault late in the round

6. 9-10 OLDH. Very close round with Trinidad scoring a couple clean single shots early on but he's struggling with the lateral movement of De La Hoya. Oscar throws those fast combinations again, landing a few decent shots in amongst it. Jim Lampley having a fucking mare calling this though, he's calling "hard shot lands for Oscar" far too often for my liking

7. 10-9 Trinidad. I thought he got the left hook through again but I would like to see Tito put 3 or 4 shots together at times. Oscar blatantly trying to steal the round late again and Jim calling the right hand through the middle again that didn't seem to land at all.Epic

35m

Will finish scoring this morning.
@turbotime you're a De La Hoya fan, I know the consensus is he should have woin it. How did you score this one?
Epic fight :rofl Oskee turned him upside down and spanked him. @One to watch @bballchump11 back me. Don King at his best.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Might as well cover the Trinidad fight to give us a little context.


Trinidad vs Vargas

1. 10-7 Trinidad. Stunning start, two knock downs from left hooks, the first he slips inside Vargas jab before cracking him, the second saw Vargas lean to his left, Tito hit the body with the left hook then followed it up to Vargas jaw as he straightened up. Vargas regained composure and scored a good right hand before Trinidad ended the round with another good left hook.

2. 10-9 Trinidad. Close first half, both circlimg in the centre of the ring and both score some solid single shots. From there Trinidad hurts Vargar twice and hunts him down but Vargas does seem to catch him with something late that stops his progress.

3. 9-10 Vargas. Trinidad nails him with a right hand early but Vargas scores the left hook to body/head, then a couple right hands of his own. Trinidad scored one good right hand before the bad low blow that stopped the round for a few minutes but on the balance I felt Vargas got the better of the telling shots

4. 7-10 Vargas. Quality left hook to knock him down and he was going for the finish when Trinidad hit him blatantly low again. Point taken as well as the knock down. Vargas wins the remainder of the round with the left hook being the hurtful shot again

5. 9-10 Vargas. Excellent round for Vargas, close to 10-8. He hit him with about every shot, hard to pin down what gave him most success and he scored a crackikg hard combination late on. Interesting he had to throw the right hand to set up the left hook earlier now it is scoring as a single shot

6. 10-9 Trinidad. Was a close affair for the first 2 minutes, both scoring a similar number but Vargas was largely just jabbing and not setting anything up off it. Trinidad throwimg his left jab liberally. But Trinidad turns the screw in the last minute and but for a brief response from Vargas, he made this round his

7. 9-9 Trinidad. He start as he ended the last winning it wide until the ref stopped it for a low blow that partially hit the belt, but harsh but another point taken. Trinidad got back on top but not as convincing after the pause but Vargas did look strong toward the end

8. 10-9 Trinidad. Good round, he landed the right hand with more regularity as well as his left hooks. Vargas scored to the body well and had a couple borderline shots, one of which Nady warned him for. But wherever they landed it did seem to halt the forward march of Trinidad

9. 10-9 Trinidad. Absolute war of a round. Vargas scores a few left hooks, a couple body shots (kind of border line again, Trinidad could have got a point taken if he were a bit more Hopkins) and even uppercuts in the first half but Trinidad hurts him with a cracking right hand and really lays it on thick in the second half throwing lots of hard shots. A couple Vargas body shots briefly slows the assault but Trinidad keeps on coming and Vargas is forced to try and trade with him with limited success

10. 10-8 Trinidad. Good close action packed round but Tito a little more busy, an edge in accuracy with the power shots and stronger. Vargas has a point taken for low blows. It's a punch thrown upwards like he was attempting an uppercut to the body, so it almost grazed but no doubt it landed well below the belt initially.

11. 9-10 Vargas. His best round in a while, threw a lot more power shots and found a lot more accuracy. Trinidad had his successes in patches between Vargas best work but this was a pretty clear round.

12. KTFO Trinidad. Right hand, left hook drops Vargas hard while throwing, gets up goes to throw a right and Trinidad drops him straight away with another left hook. Trinidad put it beyond any doubt with a sustained assault, although he does miss a few as Vargas demonstrates the upper body movement of a wacky inflatable wavy hand man but Vargas does go down and hadn't really revmcovered from the first KD of the round.

103 - 100 Trinidad going into the 12th.
Well that was a much more entertaining Trinidad fight
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Trinidad vs Vargas

1. 10-7 Trinidad. Stunning start, two knock downs from left hooks, the first he slips inside Vargas jab before cracking him, the second saw Vargas lean to his left, Tito hit the body with the left hook then followed it up to Vargas jaw as he straightened up. Vargas regained composure and scored a good right hand before Trinidad ended the round with another good left hook.

2. 10-9 Trinidad. Close first half, both circlimg in the centre of the ring and both score some solid single shots. From there Trinidad hurts Vargar twice and hunts him down but Vargas does seem to catch him with something late that stops his progress.

3. 9-10 Vargas. Trinidad nails him with a right hand early but Vargas scores the left hook to body/head, then a couple right hands of his own. Trinidad scored one good right hand before the bad low blow that stopped the round for a few minutes but on the balance I felt Vargas got the better of the telling shots

4. 7-10 Vargas. Quality left hook to knock him down and he was going for the finish when Trinidad hit him blatantly low again. Point taken as well as the knock down. Vargas wins the remainder of the round with the left hook being the hurtful shot again

5. 9-10 Vargas. Excellent round for Vargas, close to 10-8. He hit him with about every shot, hard to pin down what gave him most success and he scored a crackikg hard combination late on. Interesting he had to throw the right hand to set up the left hook earlier now it is scoring as a single shot

6. 10-9 Trinidad. Was a close affair for the first 2 minutes, both scoring a similar number but Vargas was largely just jabbing and not setting anything up off it. Trinidad throwimg his left jab liberally. But Trinidad turns the screw in the last minute and but for a brief response from Vargas, he made this round his

7. 9-9 Trinidad. He start as he ended the last winning it wide until the ref stopped it for a low blow that partially hit the belt, but harsh but another point taken. Trinidad got back on top but not as convincing after the pause but Vargas did look strong toward the end

8. 10-9 Trinidad. Good round, he landed the right hand with more regularity as well as his left hooks. Vargas scored to the body well and had a couple borderline shots, one of which Nady warned him for. But wherever they landed it did seem to halt the forward march of Trinidad

9. 10-9 Trinidad. Absolute war of a round. Vargas scores a few left hooks, a couple body shots (kind of border line again, Trinidad could have got a point taken if he were a bit more Hopkins) and even uppercuts in the first half but Trinidad hurts him with a cracking right hand and really lays it on thick in the second half throwing lots of hard shots. A couple Vargas body shots briefly slows the assault but Trinidad keeps on coming and Vargas is forced to try and trade with him with limited success

10. 10-8 Trinidad. Good close action packed round but Tito a little more busy, an edge in accuracy with the power shots and stronger. Vargas has a point taken for low blows. It's a punch thrown upwards like he was attempting an uppercut to the body, so it almost grazed but no doubt it landed well below the belt initially.

11. 9-10 Vargas. His best round in a while, threw a lot more power shots and found a lot more accuracy. Trinidad had his successes in patches between Vargas best work but this was a pretty clear round.

12. KTFO Trinidad. Right hand, left hook drops Vargas hard while throwing, gets up goes to throw a right and Trinidad drops him straight away with another left hook. Trinidad put it beyond any doubt with a sustained assault, although he does miss a few as Vargas demonstrates the upper body movement of a wacky inflatable wavy hand man but Vargas does go down and hadn't really revmcovered from the first KD of the round.

103 - 100 Trinidad going into the 12th.
Well that was a much more entertaining Trinidad fight
Previous score card from 365 was totally different

Trinidad vs Vargas


1. 10-7 Trinidad. Hurt him and knocked him down early. Surprised he never went after him more in the middle of the round. Great left hooks though

2. 10-9 Trinidad. Close in the start of the round, Trinidad hurt him and took over and Vargas had a little success near the end

3. 9-10 Vargas grew into that round and took over just before the low blow. Duva instructing him to take full 5 minutes but it must feel awkward standing stretching that out unnecessarily and Fernando goes back out.
**Scorecards being shown, was it open scoring in this fight, did the fighter get to know how it was being scored?

4. 7-10 Vargas. Good knockdown, then a punch I have always been convinced was an intentional low blow. point deducted

5. 9-10 Vargas, terrible round for Trinidad, which is saying something given he lost the previous one by 3 points, he missed with everything, Vargas slipping and ducking everything. Vargas very measured and composed and picked out accurate shot after accurate shot. The only thing that stopped that being 10-8 was that Vargas didn't throw that much, because he landed everything he let go.

6. 9-10 Vargas, Much closer round, Vargas was leading and controlling the round for the most part then Trinidad came into it late and looked to have hurt Vargas and I thought I was going to have a hard call to make, but Vargas lets some good shots go in the last ten just to cling on to it. Nice little changes in pace, just when you think you are getting a boxing match, it changes up

7. 9-9 Trinidad round. Feel he won the first minute, then after the point deduction (which felt harsh but neccesary) the round died a little, with Vargas taking maybe the only two decent shots but not enough to win it. Both guys very good at avoiding single shots, would like to see them throwing more than one or maybe switching downstairs and back up

8. 9-10 Vargas. Another round where a swing in momentum has you questioning your scoring, Lederman gave it to Trinidad but I liked Vargas work late after having Felix leading. Can't argue with Harold though, this was tight

9. 9-10 Vargas. They did it again, Vargas starts well, landing upstairs and hurting him to the body, while Trinidad misses a few combinations (making a mockery of my advice) then Trinidad hurts him and has one of his best spells of the fight before Vargas digs in and comes back again. I seem to be in the minority in the last two rounds and possibly scoring wrongly but I Like Vargas in both.

10. 10-8 all Trinidad and the point deducted. Great left hooks again from Trinidad to the body as well as the head

11. 9-10 Trinidad started well and Vargas took over. Both landed shots with either hand that stopped the other in his tracks

12. TKO Trinidad slams him with a heavy left hook early, Vargas walked right on to it after getting wobbled with a right
Gets straight back up
He's not all there when he eats another left hook.
When he gets back up he should be stopped as he's barely holding himself up as he takes a number of hard shots.

100-103. I had Vargas winning going into the last.
I'm sure last time I scored it I had given Trinidad all of the late close rounds to possibly score that the opposite way.

Great fight and only slightly spoiled with the fouling and the referee
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Probably needs a wee catch up.

Roy fighting a policeman. Looking at the record, he would have probably been as well just pulling in the nearest doughnut muncher off the street.

Keeping the midleweight theme going, here he is against former 160lb title holder Reggie Johnson.

And David Telesco, USBA champion, (tenuous link alert) whos most notable win was probably Frank Tate who also held the middleweight title about 26 pages ago

And to round off 2000 for Roy, here he is vs Eric Harding, in probably his best challenge in another spell of pretty poor opposition


Catch up on some Roy before moving onto 2001

RJJ vs Richard Frazier.
1. 10-8 Roy. Maybe harsh scoring the knockdown as he appeared to slip on an advertising board on the edge of the ring

2. KO Jones. Not the most convincing, Roy hit him and he went into partial splits and Roy hit him as he was still technically on his feet. Frazier got up at 9 and had a wobble and wasn't fully fit to fight at the count of 10.
Meh

RJJ vs Reggie Johnson.

1. 10-8 Jones. A flash knockdown, Roy scores a short fast right hand that topples Reggie, but never hurt him, possibly went over as he was about to transfer his weight forward to throw and got clipped with a straight right, may even have been a little tangle of legs

2. 10-9 Jones. Reggie tries to rush him and crowd him early but can't maintain it, once Roy starts punching and movement he takes control of the round and takes it out of Reggies hands. By the end of the 3 minutes Roy is dominating and putting combinations together

3. 10-8 Jones. Reggie never troubled himn all round, Roy in control early and at the end of the round lands a lightening fast left hook straight right to knockdown Reggie and he was definitely hurt this time. Some good insight again from Big George on foot position, he was good through the Trinidad fight as well, has there been a commentator who can be so good and so bad on diferent nights than George Foreman?

4. 10-9 Jones. Hurt Johnson early and made an attempt to stop him but gave up quite quickly and returned to his boxing. Near the end of the round he scored a lovely uppercut then proceeded to showboat and knock Reggie around a little. Think he could stop him around here if he had put the foot on the gas.

5. 10-9 Jones. Just coasting through most of the round, picking him moments to work, pot shotting and simply not getting hit. Showboats a little in the dying seconds again, he feels very comfortable in there.

6. 10-9 Jones. Started quicker here, backed Reggie to the corner early and put a barrage of shots together, albeit Reggie did slip and duck a good few of them. The rest of the round quite even as Johnson scored a few jabs and body shots with Jones pot shotting

7. 10-9 Jones. Just touching Reggie with scoring shots, mainly jabs but in range and in total control, Reggie cannot land anything due to roys reflexes and is becoming reluctant to try. Roy steps it up with a little more actiuvity and power toward the end of the round

8. 10-9 Jones. Much closer round, Johnson scored a couple of solid body shots that he should be throwing more often and scores two decent hooks in range with Roy against the ropes. But Roy gets a bit more cautious, makes space for himself and picks shots for the remainder of the round to maybe just edge this one.

9. 10-9 Jones. Another closing round, Reggie scored a few more to the body and landed the odd jab, Roy narrowly ahead going into the last 20 seconds where he landed a few hard shots that made sure of it

10. 10-9 Jones. Reggie Johnson scored very little there. It's easy to become blind to the shots Roy scores, just picking away, landing quick shot after quick shot. and you become very focussed on what the opponent might land, making any success by Reggie more pronounced, but there was little doubt here, he landed virtually nothing

11. 10-9 Jones. A little less caution, less concern for distance and what was coming back. He let his big shots go looking for a stoppage and when he did Reggie shelled up and never returned fire

12. 10-9 Jones. Was half expecting a big effort here to put Johnson away but the commentary reckon his respect for him and the show of sportmanship before the bout from both men mean that Roy is just happy with the win and has no need to stop his man.

120-106 Jones.

Reggie Johnson was as solid a challenge as Jones faced around this period and it was a shut out with Reggie landing one or 2 punches in a few of those rounds.
Roy never really going for it offensively but did more than enough to leave very little doubt about the vast majority of those rounds. There were only a couple could be described as remotely close but as I said during the round, I think I found Reggies successful shots more noticeable as they were so few and far between.
 
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Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Probably needs a wee catch up.

Roy fighting a policeman. Looking at the record, he would have probably been as well just pulling in the nearest doughnut muncher off the street.

Keeping the midleweight theme going, here he is against former 160lb title holder Reggie Johnson.

And David Telesco, USBA champion, (tenuous link alert) whos most notable win was probably Frank Tate who also held the middleweight title about 26 pages ago

And to round off 2000 for Roy, here he is vs Eric Harding, in probably his best challenge in another spell of pretty poor opposition


Going to skip the Telesco fight unless someone can tell me why it is unmissable. Going to go straight to Harding who is coming off wins over Griffin and Tarver. The first man to beat Tarver and the only man after Jones to beat Griffin. And according to the cards he takes rounds off Jones here.

1. 9-10 Harding. Lot of feints, brings the jab up from low and leading off mainly. Gambles with the right hook trying to time Roy coming in with very limited success but a good strategy if He can start to second guess Roys attacks

2. 9-10 Harding. These aren't wide rounds but both Harding rounds for me. Always edging back forcing Roy to follow. Harding always threatening something with his hands, mostly feints. Always ready to step out opf range but willing to trade shots with Roy when he does get to him.

3. 9-10 Harding. Not sure many would give Harding all 3 rounds but I like what he's doing, awkward and unpredictable, moving his head well as Roy increases the offense. Harding scoring the right hook and straight left, mixing up the order in combinations.

4. 10-9 Jones. Harding put the high guard up and lost that loose fluid and unpredictable look. Roy had his best success, touched the body a lot. Hopefully just because it was no there as a target rather than to bring the hands down, because Harding wearing the earmuffs have give Roy his best round

5. 9-10 Harding. Sustained assault early in the round trapping Roy against the ropes and wailing away. He attacks Roy with a couple more two handed assaults, With mixed success. Roy soaks a lot of it up and comes back dancing with silly footwork but lands next to nothing of his own, so the daft foot work is just for show.,

6. 10-9 Jones. Harding with the earmuffs again and Roy lets more shots go. When Harding carries his right near his waist I think Roy is wary of what's coming at him from that lead hand, and when Harding does that he relies on head movement which has been good until now. With the high guard he is relying on Roy not finding angle to get round it, which is exactly what he does especially when he swithes south paw.

7. 10-9 Jones. Harding won the frst half of the round with Jones sneaking a couple fast straight right hands in to keep it close. Second half Harding had a little spell where he roughed Roy up against the ropes, but Roy starts finding some heavy right hands from close range and hurting Harding, landing his best shots of the fight.

8. 9-10 Harding. Willing to gamble and tyhrow with Roy everytime he makes a move, scores some heavy shots right through the round, a solid right lands on Roys ear and tests is whiskers, then a couple of times in the dying seconds he lands a two handed combination, with enough getting through to absolutely guarantee him this round. Roy spent a good period aiming shots at Hardings lead arm

9. 10-9 Jones scoring with the right hand with increasing regularity. Sometimes throwing it long and straight from the outside, some times stepping in, head outside the lead right of Harding and scoring the short chopping hook

10. 10-9 Jones. Watching his feet, he's stepping outside the lead foot of Harding, moving to his left slightly, to get outside his jab and ramming the right hand home. So often Roy does the unorthodox or technically 'wrong' thing and gets away with it because of his speed, doing the unexpected often works in his favour, but here he is very much playing by the textbokk for fighting a southpaw, who has not let him away with doing things wrong and simply relying on his reflexes, quickness and athleticism.

Harding retires with a torn bicep. You can physically see the dent in the muscle. Interesting that I noted the shots directed at harding arm in the 8th, although he was targetting his lead right arm and it's the left bicep that's torn.
Shame as that was a good fight.

I had it level through 10.
95-95, having scored the 1st and 5th to Harding, other than that I agreed with everything on Ledermans card. I may have those rounds wrong, whpo knows but this was worth doing again, Harding gave Roy a lot to think about in there that he didn't often have to deal with.
 
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Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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First up way Bernard Hopkins (IBF) vs Keith Holmes (WBC) on April 14th 2001




Total PunchesHopkinsHolmes
JabsHopkinsHolmes
Landed26186
Thrown544354
Pct.48%24%
Landed340
Thrown72225
Pct.4%18%
Bernard Hopkins 159 lbs beat Keith Holmes 157 lbs by UD in round 12 of 12
Notes

  • This fight marked the first round of the 2001 Middleweight Unification Tournament.
  • Hopkins entered the tournament as the IBF Middleweight Champion, and Holmes was the WBC Middleweight Champion.
  • The New York Times reported:
    • Hopkins controlled Saturday's fight from the third round, winning easily on all three judges' scorecards. There were no knockdowns, but Hopkins dictated the action with a sustained body attack and rattled Holmes several times with punches to the head. The biggest problem for Hopkins on Saturday was avoiding hitting Holmes with low blows. Hopkins complained before the fight that Holmes wore his trunks too high, and his concern about being penalized for low blows proved to be valid. With 48 seconds left in the fifth round, a point was taken from Hopkins for a low blow, and on two other occasions, timeouts were given to Holmes after he complained of low blows. In Hopkins's mind, Holmes wearing his trunks high made it difficult to avoid hitting him below the belt. "The guy had turtleneck trunks on," Hopkins said. "If a man brings a turtleneck into the ring, what are you going to do? Maybe one or two of the blows were low, but they weren't intentional. I couldn't let it bother my game plan."
  • After 11 rounds, HBO's unofficial judge Harold Lederman's scorecard had Hopkins up 109-99. [3]

View attachment 32293

1. 9-10 Holmes. Very close round, Holmes maybe kept Bernard at the distance he was hoping to fight at slightly longer than Hopkins managed to get inside and pressure and rough him up. Holmes landed one southpaw left late in the round to just prevent me scoring it 10-10 like Merchant.

2. 10-9 Hopkins. Closes the distance very quickly for an old fella. But not just to get into punching range but right past it into a clinch, he actually runs at Holmes a few times, delivering one or two good shots then right into holding, spoiling, roughing him up and indeed fouling. George said Holmes has eyes like flashlights, I've noticed that before, very wide eyed, almost looks terrified, but it's just the look on his face when focussed, very intense

3. 10-9 Hopkins. Good round for Bernard, scored some nice shots and ended the round on a series of good shots in combination in the pocket. Foreman commented that Holmes is being forced to lead but would like to be countering. There can't be many fighters as hard to counter as Hopkins, the way he moves in, head off centre, throwing on the way in he uses his arms well to protect himself. And of course the opponent often has his great big forehead to worry about into the bargain

4. 10-9 Hopkins. Making Holmes feel very uncomfortable in there, stepping in, just throwing the right hand hard to head or body, then standing inside and working Holmes with short shots. Lederman correctly points out that Holmes isn't proficient in tying Hopkins up to stop him working him over but neither is he willing to work with him. Few warnings for low blows, bit of a mixed bag, as Hopkins is intentionally straying low on the refs blind side but Holmes does wear his trunks round his ribcage

5. 9-9 Hopkins, point deducted for low blow and it's a good call. Holmes flicking his jab out with no intent of landing it, Hopkins comes in hard throwing that right hand with every intention of landing it and he does. Where he gets there he out works Holmes. Holmes does land a few good body shots but Hopkins lands more and lands harder. Corner tell Hopkins after the round to double the shots on the way in, I like him scoring the single right personally but they want him setting it up with the jab

6. 10-9 Hopkins, Holmes just not doing enough and Hopkins starting to come on stronger. Holmes does actually exchange with him early. Hopkins gets slightly the better of it but Holmes landing some solid shots in there, but he doesn't want that kind of heat and goes back to a cautious low output approach and Hopkins starts landing in hard combinations and really wins this round wide in the end. Lot's of talk of low blows and some do stray but that takes away from talking about the very impressive body work Hopkins actually is doing and he's hurting Holmes to the body.

7. 10-9 Holmes. A lot more good inside work, a lot of good body punching. Outworking him but also far more skilled at how to get the angles and shots to be successful inside. Holmes still not nearly busy enough either. This is a unification fight and you'd think this is a stay busy fight for Hopkins

8. 10-9. Hopkins. First half of the round Holmes lets his hands go from arms length, the kind of range that should suit him, yet Hopkins is too cute, his movement makes him miss more than hit and Hopkins probably lands more with a similar output. From there we see Holmes get a bit gunshy again.
Strange one with the low blows, Hopkins hits below that high belt line again, Smoger calls it, then Holmes reacts and goes and crouches in the corner. Smoger then warns Bernard, one more and your DQ'd, but doesn't take a point

9. 10-9 Hopkins. His corner told him to loop in the right hand and not punch down stairs. Bernard listens to neither instruction. He shoots the right straight and keeps hitting the body with a couple of those straying low. One right hand hits the thigh of Holmes right in front of Smoger, he see's it and just tells him to keep em up

10. 10-9 Hopkins. more of the same, more work, more accuracy, more leg punches and again, when Foreman compliments Holmes on a good left hand, he's quickly complimenting Hopkins on the strong response. Bernard will not accept losing any exchange, let alone a round now.

11. 10-9 Hopkins, the last few round Hopkins has followed the instruction from his corner to add the jab before the right hand and it has been every bit as effective as the single right. Holmes landed something decent early in the round and in typical fashion Hopkins answers with better and hurts him with a left hook counter to the top of the head. Holmes would have been hurting everywhere from the top of the head to the knee come April 15th, Bernard has landed so many hard blows and hit him everywhere now

12. 10-9 Hopkins all the way and he came dangerously close to being disqualified in a fight he absolutely strolled. Even going for the knock out.
Bit harsh from commentary, saying the low blow wasn't hard, replays show he caught him twice in quick succession with right hands to the side of the cup, Smoger not impressed either, but that is the third time Smoger called a low blow and Holmes seems to do some play acting after the call, each time going to the corner to kneel, the first of which he supposedly winked at George Foreman

118-109 Hopkins
Could easily have been a shutout. I've seldom seen a combination of such a solid performance from the winner with such a meek capitulation by a champion.

I need to watch more of the post fight interviews in these bouts, Hopkins is an entertaining dude with Larry after the bout.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Next up was William Joppy defending his WBA title against unified 154lb champion Felix Trinidad



View attachment 32294


"20 Years Later: The Peak of Tito Mania – Felix Trinidad vs. William Joppy
Posted on 05/12/2021​
“Tito Trinidad may be the deadliest puncher in these divisions since Ray Robinson.” – Larry Merchant​
20 years ago, on May 12, 2001, at Madison Square Garden, the second half of Don King’s middleweight world championship tournament took place when Puerto Rico’s Felix “Tito” Trinidad (42-3, 35 KOs) faced off against William Joppy (40-7-2, 30 KOs) for his WBA middleweight title.​
Trinidad, 28, entered the fight with a record of 39-0 with 30 knockouts, and Joppy, 30, came in with a record 32-1-1 with 24 knockouts.​
The tournament would crown boxing’s first undisputed middleweight champion since Marvin Hagler.​
Longtime reigning IBF middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins had taken care of business in the first bout of the tournament, winning a wide unanimous decision over Keith Holmes to unify the WBC and IBF titles.​
Trinidad was coming off of the most prominent year of his career in 2000, where he moved up from welterweight to junior middleweight and unified the WBA and IBF titles scoring significant victories over David Reid and Fernando Vargas.​
The bout with Vargas is regarded as one of the best in the history of the junior middleweight division and led to Trinidad being awarded Fighter of the Year honors for the year 2000. Trinidad’s father, Felix Trinidad Sr., also earned the Trainer of the Year award to put a cap on a spectacular year.​
Trinidad’s move up in weight was an attempt to make history to become one of just a handful of fighters to hold titles in the welterweight and middleweight divisions.​
Some of the greatest fighters in the sport’s history had held titles at welterweight and middleweight, including Ray Robinson, Ray Leonard, Thomas Hearns, and Emile Griffith.​
By defeating Joppy, Trinidad would become the first fighter since Ray Leonard to win a middleweight title in his first fight at the weight class.​
“My goal is to win the 160-pound middleweight crown on May 12 against William Joppy and then go on to unify the title by beating Bernard Hopkins,” Trinidad stated through a translator for an HBO preview show promoting the bout with Joppy. “I know that I’m fighting against boxers who are perhaps more powerful who may hit harder, but I’d like to tell them all, Joppy and then Hopkins, to watch out for me because I really want to win.​
“I really want to knock them out, and I’m certain that when they feel my punch, they will know who Tito Trinidad is. They’re going to find out where my middleweight punch is, I guarantee it.”​
During this time, Trinidad was the most popular boxer out of the island of Puerto Rico. Similar to fighters like Manny Pacquiao or Ricky Hatton, he fought with the weight of a country behind him that brought more meaning every time he stepped inside the squared circle.​
In the early 2000s, the pound-for-pound list was a round-robin between Trinidad, Shane Mosley, and Roy Jones Jr.​
As the longest-reigning champion in welterweight history, having made 15 title defenses holding victories over Oscar De La Hoya, Pernel Whitaker, Oba Carr, Yory Boy Campas among others, and then moving up to unify at junior middleweight, Trinidad had as a good a case as anyone for the pound-for-pound crown.​
“Felix has the qualities of an idol and celebrity, but also and most importantly the qualities of a hero that merits an example to the young and all the people,” stated Trinidad’s then-attorney Jose Nicolas Medina. “ We have great champions that have been champions in one category. He is the first number one pound-for-pound in the whole sport.”​
Trinidad’s opponent, Joppy, was the ultimate underdog heading into the fight. His career trajectory mirrored some of today’s fighters, such as Demetrius Andrade, as a world champion who was looking for his opportunity to prove himself against the best.​
Joppy started boxing at the age of 20, the same age that Trinidad won his first world title at welterweight. He would get his first title opportunity by traveling to Japan and stopping Shinji Takehara via a ninth-round stoppage to win the WBA middleweight title.​
Joppy would make two defenses before losing the title by controversial decision to the Dominican Republic’s Julio Cesar Green in August 1997. The Virginia native would get his revenge on Green a few months later in January 1998, winning a dominant unanimous decision in a rematch.​
In January 1999, tragedy struck Joppy when an auto accident broke c7 vertebrae in his neck, leaving him out of the ring for most of the year.​
Miraculously, Joppy would return in the summer of 1999 and would go on to make five defenses in his second reign, even scoring a seventh-round stoppage over Green in a rubber match.​
For Joppy, the fight with Trinidad was his opportunity to become a household name and earn bigger paydays. More importantly, the Trinidad fight represented a chance at recognition and notoriety.​
“This is my great fight,” Joppy stated during an HBO interview promoting the fight. “This is going to get me over that hump. This is going to put me on that pound-for-pound list. This is my dream come true. I know that Trinidad is the house fighter, but I’m going to shock the world.”​
Having been a career-long middleweight, Joppy felt that he would be able to handle Trinidad, who spent most of his career at welterweight.​
“Trinidad can not deal with me,” Joppy said during one of the final press conferences. “Him beating Vargas and David Reid, they were still babies. He’s dealing with a veteran now. Welcome to the middleweights, Trinidad.​
“I’m going to show him things he’s never seen before.”​
Heading into the fight with an outstanding record of 19-0 with 15 knockouts in world title fights, Trinidad didn’t lack confidence in facing Joppy.​
“Well, he should go ahead and try to back me up,” said Trinidad. “And then do whatever he’s been saying he’s going to do. Once we’re in the ring, I will show him. He might want to do what he said, but whether I let him do it or not is another matter.​
“Let’s see on May 12 if he can do a fraction of what he said he’s going to do.”​
The stage was set in front of the pro-Puerto Rican crowd at Madison Square Garden in one of the greatest atmospheres boxing has seen.​
Ring Magazine’s Editor-in-Chief Doug Fischer and former ESPN Senior Writer Dan Rafael described the atmosphere as electric and one of the best crowds for a fight that they have attended.​
When Trinidad made his entrance, the crowd went into a frenzy, with loud chants of Tito reverberating throughout the arena. Trinidad basked in the roar of the crowd as a fighter who loved the adulation he received from his fans.​
The fight began with Joppy taking the initiative heading straight out to Trinidad. However, this proved to be a vital mistake, as Joppy’s lack of focus on defense would prove to be his downfall.​
With 48 seconds remaining in the first round, Joppy left his hands down by his waist, and Trinidad took immediate advantage by landing a quick left hook that stunned the Virginia fighter.​
Another left hook and right hand followed, putting Joppy down hard on the canvas. He was able to get up to wobbly legs with the bell saving him from further punishment.​
Joppy’s corner was in a panic, leaving him standing in his corner while yelling instructions. But, the middleweight champion’s resolve and high activity level kept him in the fight.​
The second round was a showcase for Trinidad’s accuracy as he landed 29 out of 49 punches at a 59 percent connect rate. But Joppy kept throwing punches in an attempt to overwhelm the Puerto Rican.​
Joppy’s most effective round came in the third when he threw a record 116 punches, the most ever thrown against Trinidad in a fight tracked by CompuBox.​
Trinidad’s power was on full display against Joppy. But, the fight highlighted some of his often-overlooked attributes in finding and taking advantage of openings and his overall accuracy.​
In the first minute of the fourth round, Trinidad caught Joppy with a left hook while his hands were down, causing him to roll over on the canvas from another knockdown.​
Joppy somehow managed to survive the round, but the end seemed imminent.​
In the fifth round, Trinidad landed a pair of right hands on the inside after creating space. The first right landed, and as Joppy was swaying down, Trinidad landed another brutal right hand. Joppy attempted to get up on wobbly legs forcing referee Arthur Mercante Jr. to stop the fight at the 2:25 mark.​
The Puerto Rican landed an unbelievable 108 out of 191 total punches at a 57 percent rate, with 80 of those punches being power shots.​
Trinidad, now holding the WBA middleweight title as a three-division champion, stood tall as arguably the best in the world. One can argue if Trinidad was indeed the greatest fighter to come out of Puerto Rico, but his popularity could not be questioned.​
While fighters like Carlos Ortiz, Wilfredo Gomez, Wilfred Benitez may have fought in more revered eras, they never peaked at the zenith that Trinidad reached.​
Trinidad’s run from 1999 to 2001 was a short one, but the significance of that period would be what other Puerto Rican fighters would be measured by from that point forward.​
In September 2001, the run would come to an end at the hands of Bernard Hopkins in the finals of the middleweight tournament.​
The pressure in which Trinidad put on his opponents could only be compared to the pressure he felt having to fight with the weight and emotions of an entire country.​
For the night of May 12, 2001, at the world’s most famous arena, Felix Trinidad and Puerto Rico were at the top of the boxing world."​

1. 8-10 Trinidad. Really good authoritative start, solid jab, looking to fight, landing the hard right but 45 seconds to go Trinidad hurts him and hurts him some more and eventually drops him and Joppy is all over the place. He survives the dying seconds and basically falls to his corner

2. 10-9 Joppy. Really good round, Joppy starts well having recovered, establishes the jab and takes control of the patient Trinidad. Tito comes into it with a couple nice combinations in the second minute, before the fight finishes fairly even. Both men score with a jab to the head, jab to the body right hand upstairs sequence and it work nicely for both men when they try it.

3. 10-9 Joppy. Trinidad starts right from the opening bell and looks the heavier handed and is backing Joppy up. But Joppy withstands the early pressure and establishes that good fast jab of him, mixing some other good work off the back of it and hoilds the centre of the ring in a very busy round

4. 8-10 Trinidad. Spectacular fight, can't believe I've never watched this one. Great fun. Joppy starts well again, letting his hands go but Trinidad gets started and lands a stunning left hook that drops Joppy hard and he gets back to his feet and sinks to his knees again, questionable whether Mercante Jr should have let him continue after the 8 count but fair play to Joppy he held his own in the remaining minute or so, in spite of being on unsteady legs

5. KO Trinidad. Outstanding stuff, Joppy came out working at a high rate, fast shots not flicking any of them. George criticises him for standing in front of Tito and that's exactl;y what he does, should probably be criticised for the high output too as he noticeably tires half way through the round and you see the arms slowing, but he keeps throwing them. Trinidad hurts him as soon as he starts throwing, no question Trinidad carried the power up to 160lbs, he reall was a murderous puncher but even after he obviously hurt him, Joppy just keeps on throwing. Trinidad clearly hurting him just keeps on bouncing his head around with massive shots until Joppy's legs give way. He does the dopuble fall think and can barely stand up as the ref grabs him and calls it a night.

There was a lot to like about Joppy here, he gave it his all, lot of work, lot of variation, still with that great hand speed and against any other fighter you might argue good power too.
But Felix, was accurate and clever in his shot selection and just a devastating puncher. And one of the best finishers in the sport. Thoroughly enjoyed that one
 

Davie

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These threads really add a bit of context to some of these wins for me, as I never followed it as it happened.
I knew Joppy and Holmes were the champions around the time Hopkins reigned but knew little about them and assumed them to be pretty weak opposition. Having witnessed them at world level, Holmes was a decent world level operator which makes the nature of Hopkins beat down all the more impressive.
Joppy however was a good fighter, skilled and quick, my biggest criticism was that in his first few edefences he ran a bit much, coasted at times and flicked with the jab, not sitting down on his shots. But I really liked what I saw in his last few fights up to and including Trinidad, where he sat down on shots, fought with aggression mixed with that speed and skill and looked to hurt his opponent. Obviously that was partly his undoing against Felix Trinidad but it all puts Tito's win in perspective too, because that was a destructive win over a good world champion who deserved his place.
I look forward to seeing Trinidad vs Hopkins now. I've watched that one a while back but always just assumed Hopkins beat the smaller man coming up from welterweight towards the end of his career and saw that as similar to Monzon vs Griffith and Napolez. But Trinidad has made his mark on the division already and not only beat a legit titlist but done so in destructive fashion and showed he coul;d deal with the power of a good middleweight but also carried the power to take his head off.

I'm looking forward to seeing the Hopkins vs Joppy fight too now.

All in this is painting middleweight Hopkins in a somewhat more flattering light than I saw it previously.
 

Davie

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Saturday 29th, September 2001. WBC, IBF & the newly created WBA super world middleweight titles on the line.
Bernard 'The Executioner' Hopkins vs Felix 'Tito' Trinidad.




Bernard Hopkins vs. Felix Trinidad
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Hopkins drops Trinidad in the 12th round.
Felix Trinidad 159 lbs lost to Bernard Hopkins 157 lbs by TKO at 1:18 in round 12 of 12

Notes
Felix Trinidad vs. Bernard Hopkins (poster).jpg
  • The fight was originally scheduled for September 15, 2001, but it was postponed due to the September 11th terrorist attacks.
  • Final of The Middleweight World Championship Series.
  • Trinidad was a 2 to 1 betting favorite.
  • Hopkins dropped Trinidad with a right in the 12th round.
  • Trinidad's trainer, Felix Trinidad Sr., came into the ring and stopped the fight.
  • Trinidad earned $9 million, and Hopkins earned $2.5 million.
  • The fight generated 475,000 pay-per-view buys and $20.4 million in PPV revenue. [1] [2]
  • Round 10 was named The Ring Magazine Round of the Year for 2001.



" Hopkins is undisputed middleweight champ​
Associated Press​
NEW YORK -- Felix Trinidad made a judgment of Bernard Hopkins in the first round, and it was wrong. Really wrong.
He's nothing, I got him," Trinidad told his father-trainer at the end of the opening round.​
But 11 rounds later, Trinidad was a beaten fighter for the first time in his career, and the 36-year-old Hopkins was the undisputed middleweight champion.​
Hopkins knocked down Trinidad and stopped him at 1:22 of the final round early Sunday before a screaming but shocked crowd of 19,075 in Madison Square Garden.​
"I wanted to show my greatness, and I think I did -- halfway," Hopkins said. "I'm not great yet, but I will be. Nobody can stand up to me."​
If Hopkins doesn't consider himself a great fighter, anybody who watched him against Trinidad would have to judge this a great performance.​
He dominated the second half of the fight, rocking Trinidad several times and then knocking him down with a crunching right. Trinidad struggled up at 9 and as referee Steve Smoger looked at him, the fighter's father climbed into the ring to stop it.​
It was Trinidad's first loss in 41 professional fights and the first defeat in 21 championship fights for the 28-year-old Puerto Rican, who is a former welterweight and super welterweight champion.​
Trinidad went into the ring in search of not only the title, but of a knockout victory over an opponent who had twice thrown down the Puerto Rican flag in pre-fight news conferences. He didn't come close to his 34th knockout.​
Hopkins, a champion since 1995, went into the ring with the WBC and IBF middleweight titles and added the WBA championship. He also fought his way out from under the shadows of Trinidad and fighters such as Oscar de la Hoya and Roy Jones. Jr.​
Before the fight, a member of Hopkins' camp claimed Trinidad's right hand was wrapped illegally. Trinidad complained, but did have the hand rewrapped.​
Trinidad entered the ring pumped up, while Hopkins, a Philadelphian who bills himself as "The Executioner", wore a red-hooded mask and remained calm. Hopkins also had stenciled on his back "Golden Palace.com" for a Costa Rica casino which paid him $100,000, which he bet on himself as the underdog.​
"He's a great fighter," Trinidad said. "I thought the fight was even until the end."​
One judge had Hopkins ahead 109-100 after 11 rounds, and the other two each had it 107-102.​
The AP card favored Hopkins 108-101.​
A CompuBox punch analysis credited Hopkins with landing 260 of 653 punches and Trinidad 129 of 329.​
After he realized he won, Hopkins jumped up on the ropes in a neutral corner and chanted, "U-S-A, U-S-A. He then embraced Trinidad and said, "I want to tell you and your Puerto Rican fans that there was nothing personal about the flag."​
Hopkins (40-2-1, 29 knockouts) also said he would go to Puerto Rico and talk to the people. He also talked about giving Trinidad a rematch.​
Hopkins fought a brilliant fight. He gave Trinidad lots of movement, stiff jabs and, when Trinidad tried to attack, Hopkins simply outgunned him with both hands to the body and head.​
While Hopkins' victory might have been unexpected, it was also one-sided. He dominated the last six rounds and had Trinidad in all kinds of trouble.​
In the sixth round, Trinidad landed several shots in what was the best round of the fight. The two men went toe-to-toe on several occasions, with Trinidad having the best of it most often.​
He ended the round with three or four shots to the head.​
It was Trinidad's last hurrah.​
Hopkins' strength began to come to the fore in the second half of the fight. He landed several good head shots in the seventh, eighth and ninth rounds, and had Trinidad wobbly on occasion.​
Then in the 10th, Hopkins drove Trinidad around the ring, and just before the bell he landed a tremendous right to the head that had Trinidad tottering. At the bell, Trinidad wobbled back to his corner.​
Hopkins, who weighed 157 pounds to 158{ for Trinidad, continued to dish out punishment in the 11th round and then finished it at 1:22 of the 12th.​
The victory gave Hopkins a 14-1-1 record with 10 knockouts in championship matches. Trinidad's loss snapped a streak of 20 victories, 17 by knockout, in championship bouts.​
Hopkins earned $2.5 million with a victory that will earn him much more, while Trinidad earned $9 million.​
The fight originally was scheduled for Sept. 15, but was postponed for two weeks after the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.​

1. 10-9 Hopkins. Crafty but cautious but he's found the left hand a few times and approaching in that awkward style that stops Trinidad landing clean with the few power shots he attempts.

2. 10-9 Hopkins. Lampley says he needs to be way outside or right inside, not in between and that's a fair assessment. Right now it's a lot more way outside, controlling Trinidad with the long jab, only occasionally steppign in with the right then spoiling. But he lands a peach of a right hand late on

3. 10-9 Hopkins. Razor thin margins in that one. Both landed just a handful of good shots, nothing between them there. Just think Bernards control of positioning and tempo are what make me lean toward him there.

4. 10-9 Hopkins. Controlled a good part when he lead. But he impressed me most when Trinidad scored, any good shots from Trinidad drew a response from Hopkins who made sure he fiered back just as hard. A brave response

5. 10-9 Hopkins. Better jab again keeping Trinidad quiet. Trinidad opens up about halfway and Hopkins just takes over from there, unleashing both hands, his ability to hit and not be hit in the pocket when there's frenetic action is a joy to behold.

6. 10-9 Hopkins Really good round, Felix coming at Hopkins with big shots and Bernard has an answer for everything. Spends a lot of time with his back near the ropes but when he can't be cute and slip the shots, he soaks them up on the gloves and responds immediately, almost alway with just the right shot

7. 10-9 Hopkins. He has Felix following now and Hopkins is doing all the right thinks to keep Felix from throwing, unlike what Oscar did in the last 4, Bernard is firing back and always giving him somethignto think about.

8. 10-9 Hopkins. Scores with a lot of nice choppping hooks with either hand. His hand speed during a couple flurries midround was special, he shows a little flashy footwork and then the punch stats at the end of the round show he is significantly out working Trinidad. Remarkable stuff for a 36 year old

9. 10-9 Hopkins. A near flawless round, really good stuff. He is so composed in range, just sees everything and selects the right move time after time and limits Felix to so very little success

10. 10-9 Hopkins. First half Hopkins keeps him at arms reach, getting of first and when Trinidad counters, Bernard counters that counter. Second half is a top class in fighting war and Bernard works harder, matches Felix for power shots and more, throwing in combination with speed and lands so many uppercuts, Trinidad looks on his way out at the bell. Bernard also showing elite level toughness as nothing seems to put a dent in him.

11. 10-9 Hopkins. I've pretty much covered everything, not much more to be said about this, a virtuoso performance and he's got Trinidad going again in the second half of theis round. Tito a tired and beaten fighter

12. KTFO Hopkins. Again, it's Bernard countering the counter, the shot Tito scores right before the big shot that ends it, looked his best shot in rounds and a second later he's flat on his back.

Hopkins was physically, technically and tactically better than a great champion in Trindad, in every way. A total shut of and a beat down
 
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Davie

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Amidst all the excitement of the 2001 middleweight tournament, I've kind of neglected the lower level of the middleweight division.

It just so happens that a British and European update will throw up some names that will feature at world level soon.

The BBBoC British title.
I left this with Glenn Catley beating the exciting Neville Brown.
Catleys next move was to face Richie Woodhall up at 168lb (which I might throw in too).
The vacant crown was contested by Howard Eastman and Steve Foster. Eastman winning the title via 7th round stoppage.

Eastman then won the vacant IBO inter-continental title at SMW, followed by the WBA inter-continental middleweight title followed by the WBA continental middleweight title, all against people I've never heard of held in leisure centres
He returned to the British title, defending it against it against Derek Wormald.

Eastman then beat unbeaten Mike Algoet for the CBA middleweight title, I have no idea what that stands for and Cant be arsed finding out (baddum tssh @Shadowboxer )

Eastman then beat 3 guys with losing records before fightimg Akhmet Dottuev to add the WBA international middleweight title to their continental and inter-continental titles, before beating future world middleweight champion Sam Soliman to add the commonwealth title to his now bulging trophy cabinet.

Now up to speed in 2001, Howard Eastman defends his British and commonwealth titles while picking up the vacant EBU title fighting Robert McCracken fresh off his loss to Keith Holmes.

 

Davie

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Post number 600.

EBU European title.

I left this in the capable hands of Hacine Cherifi having beaten Zaytsev in 1997. Of course Cherifi has now featured at world level, winning and losing to Holmes as well as losing to Joppy and Simon Brown.
But in the interest of keeping things complete, I'll document his EBU reign and the fate of that title.

After beating Zaytsev on the cards, he would also UD Branco Sobot who would go on to challenge Joe Calzagje in 98.
Cherifi then stops Brown in a 6 round war, which I covered earlier in the thread with my last British title update.
Cherifi of course then went off to challenge at a higher level, leaving the EBU title for a rematch between Agostino Cardamone and Alexander Zaytsev

Frenchman Erland Betare would then capture the title against Ali Ennebati, his first defence of course came against Alexander Zaytsev before a final successful defence against Davide Ciarlante, all covering the 12 round distance and none of which I have any intention of viewing, though the footage does exist)

The EBU rounds off nicely with Howard Eastman knocking out Robert McCracken, as posted in the British title post above
 
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