Davie's 85-05 middleweight era thread

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Gent's I've been thinking about doing a thread on this era for some time.
It's a remarkable era in world boxing, mainly due to the sheer volume of world class fighters that pass through the division in one decade.
It's a specific time frame that doesn't quite get the same attention, as it begins with the waning of the reign of the great Marvin Hagler and the rivalries with the fab four as Duran, Leonard and Hearns pass fleetingly through the division.
And it ends with the beginning of a new long term ruler in Bernard Hopkins and the introduction of ATG legends James Toney and Roy Jones Jr.
It could be seen as a transition between the two eras but a hell of a lot happens in between, with the likes of McCallum, Nunn and Kalumbay among many many other top class names passing through.

From 85-95, the list of names includes:
Marvin Hagler, Roberto Duran, Ray Leonard, Thomas Hearns, Wilfred Benitez, John Mugabi, Herol Graham, Iran Barkley, Donald Curry Michael Nunn, Sumbu Kalambay, Mike McCallum, Julian Jackson, Michael Watson, Steve Collins, Nigel Benn, Chris Eubank, Reggie Johnson, John David Jackson, Gerald McClellan, James Toney, Roy Jones Jr, Bernard Hopkins
and the likes of
Milton McCrorie, Robbie Sims, Lindell Holmes, Frank Tate, Jorge Castro among others making up the numbers

That is a wealth of talent and a lot of good fights and rivalries. As well as missed opportunities.
I'm going to try to work through it in a methodical fashion over the next couple of months and it's a learning curve for me as much as anyone else, as I didn't watch much of this at the time other than Eubank vs Benn.
I'll post fights to review, look at individual fighters more in depth and perhaps dip briefly into 154lb and 168lb to give the full picture.
If you can leave me to running it and posting the new fights and topics just to keep the pace of it in a chronological fashion. But all input, discussions, opinions and nuggets of wisdom and experience beyond that are more than welcome.

I'll get a little time later with my first post to kick it off, with a look back at the Hagler reign and the fab 4 getting the decade up and running.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
s-l300.jpg


You don't get to do a middleweight thread from the 80's without mentioning the Marvelous One
Marvin Hagler had dominated the 80's and was the second longest reigning champion in defences and length of reign, behind Monzon and Zale respectively. He also held the stoppage % record for middleweight champions, although he will now rank 2nd behind GGG, you would think.

For a long time he was my no1 middleweight (now third behind Monzon and Greb) and my favourite of the fab 4 (not sure where he is now)
As we usher in the start of this era at 1985, Marvelous was starting to get the recognition he craved and the big fights and paydays he chased.
He had long felt he had been under-appreciated and even had to change his name legally to 'Marvelous Marvin Hagler' to get people to cal him it.

He had completely cleared out the middleweight class and he wanted Duran, Hearns and Leonard. And he got them, in 3 of the most talked about bouts in the history of the sport.
I won't dwell on the fabulous four, as they are a thread topic in their own right and have been discussed on forums as much as any group of fighters. Plus, Leonard, Hearns and Duran largely just passed through the division, other than the odd fight against Iran Barkley, they never really fought anyone but Marv at 160lbs.

But we can't kick this off without the recognition of the man that ruled the class at the beginning of my time frame.
Here we have Marv in all his glory

1983 Marvelous Marvin Hagler vs Roberto Duran for all the baubles.
Possibly the best performance I've ever witnessed in defeat by Duran and an astounding feat for a natural lightweight giving up height and serious reach advantage. Marv wasn't bad either

1985 "The War" Marvelous Marvin Hagler vs Thomas Hitman Hearns
The popular go-to fight in the "best fight ever" discussion

1987 Marvelous Marvin Hagler vs Sugar Ray Leonard.
Hotly contested outcome and the end of Marvs illustrious career

Watch, enjoy and discuss.
Most everyone will have seen these and discussed anything we could ever think of discussing but if you haven't watched them before now, cancel what you had planned for the rest of the day

Interesting fact for the day - I just learned that 2 time Middleweight title challenger, Robbie Sims, was Haglers half brother.
In 1988, Sims faced Sumbu Kalambay, who had won the WBA title Hagler was stripped of, for not facing mandatory challenger Herol Graham, so he could fight Sugar Ray Leonard.
 
Last edited:

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
If Hagler had got the decision v Leonard,where would he rank in ATG terms?

Possibly not a great deal higher.
Leonard just out of retirement, with a detached retina, a long layoff and first time at 160lbs.
Marv would not have got the recognition Leonard does for the win he has.

Kind typical of the hard luck stories of Haglers life (particularly if you listened to Marv)

Haglers stint at the top, kind of mirrors Monzons reign in a few ways, started off wioth a couple of fights against Italians (Antuofermo and Benvenuti) they cleared out the division, then the biggest names they fought were coming up from lighter divisions. (Hearns/Leonard/Duran vs Napoles/Griffith)
Difference being, Monzon beat Napoles and Griffith
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Having started off with the bang of the fabulous four and having harked about the depth and quality between 85-95 I've actually set myself for an inauspicious beginning to this era.
Hagler had cleared out the division and the middleweight top 10 at the beginning of 85, was filled with Marvs victims, past and future.

Marvin Hagler, Champion
Thomas Hearns
John Mugabi
James Shuler
James Kinchen
Don Lee
Mustafa Hamsho
Tony Sibson
Dwight Davison
Alex Ramos
Curtis Parker

Sibson had been dispatched in 6 rounds in 83, Hamsho had been stopped twice by Marv.
Hearns and Mugabi would be stopped in brutal fashion over the next couple years and Leonard was still retired.
Meanwhile the 154lb division held the future of the division in McCallum and Jackson, building towards the top.

So in February 1985, other than talk of the fab 4, the biggest talking point in the middleweight class might have been a promising NABF title fight between the holder, James Shuler, a former Olympic team member, who defeated Sugar Ray Seales for the title in 82 and was now making his 3rd defence against 27 year old up and coming USBA champion James Kinchen, who was coming off the back of a solid stoppage win over top 10 ranked Alex Ramos


This would have been viewed by many as a fight to establish a future challenger or champion.... With hindsight, it wasn't, well not at 160lb for Kinchen anyway. but worth a watch

Screenshot_20210421-201557_Samsung Internet.jpg
 
Last edited:

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
I had Shuler winning quite comfortably, boxing well with his range and switch hitting.
Kinchen was wild, dirty at times and unorthodox. But looked a threat throughout

This bout was an eliminator to fight the winner of Hagler vs Hearns. That never happened as Hagler beat Hearns, and had a year before fighting Mugabi then another year before Leonard.
Shuler did go on to have a stay busy fight after the win, before defending the NABF title against Hearns, who I can only imagine was angry after the Hagler war, because he smashed Shuler in 1m 13s
Shuler died in a motorcycle accident a week after the Hearns fight.
Kinchen went on to lose at 168 and 175 against Barkley, Roldan, Hearns, Virgil Hill, and Charles Williams
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Herol Graham

Here's a guy that fits perfectly into my time frame. In the early 80's Herol had built up a nice run at 154lbs, winning Commonwealth, British and European titles, fighting home and away against the best the UK and elsewhere had to offer. He went away to France to defend his European crown with a good win over Germain Lemaitre.

Late 84, he announced his arrival onto the middleweight scene with a very good win over a fine fighter in Lindell Holmes.

He stopped 3 more middleweights in as many months at the end of 84 and started 85 with another Stoppage win.
In April of the same year, he got a shot at Tony Sibsons recently vacated British crown against Jimmy Price. I watched it last night and Herol showed how ruthless he could be at a lower level

After that Herol went on to face good fighters like Ayub Kalule and Mark Kaylor to push his way to mandatory challenger to Hagler.
Hagler was stripped of the WBA and IBF titles, as he "ducked" Herol to fight Sugar Ray Leonard.

From 85 - 92 Herol faced some terrific fighters, fights I will post up later in the thread, as I try to keep this chronological.
But with names like Kalambay, McCallum, Jackson on his slate as well as late efforts at higher weights against Pazienza and Brewer, Herol was the best fighter these isles have produced who has not lifted a world title....and as we'll see, he was very unfortunate not to do so.



maxresdefault.jpg


ps I'm going to try to manage this thread to keep it in order.. but comments and discussion more than welcome @One to watch @Lunny @Bogotazo @Chatty @Chinny @Bolo @Shadowboxer @DaveT @David Ike Ibeabuchi @Drew @Zopilote @Jack_Ledger @SJS
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Mate this is brilliant.


Keep up the awesome work Davie 👍🏻.

I’d like to see some other weight divisions done after this by you or someone else.


I've only got to April 1985, this has plenty leg before I start a new one.
But I have a few idea. 40/50 LHW's would be great but might lack footage.
Would love to see a @Flea Man collaboration at 108/112 in the 80's/90's
60's/70's lightweights? From Ortiz beating Brown, through to Duran heading to welter...

Liston ==> Holmes one would be great.
Everyone knows the Ail, Foreman, Frazier fights but more in depth into the likes of Chuvalo/Quarry/Bonavena/Ellis/Lyle/Norton/Terrel/Shavers/Bugner/Young etc would be enjoyable
 
Last edited:

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Herol Graham

Here's a guy that fits perfectly into my time frame. In the early 80's Herol had built up a nice run at 154lbs, winning Commonwealth, British and European titles, fighting home and away against the best the UK and elsewhere had to offer. He went away to France to defend his European crown with a good win over Germain Lemaitre.

Late 84, he announced his arrival onto the middleweight scene with a very good win over a fine fighter in Lindell Holmes.

He stopped 3 more middleweights in as many months at the end of 84 and started 85 with another Stoppage win.
In April of the same year, he got a shot at Tony Sibsons recently vacated British crown against Jimmy Price. I watched it last night and Herol showed how ruthless he could be at a lower level

After that Herol went on to face good fighters like Ayub Kalule and Mark Kaylor to push his way to mandatory challenger to Hagler.
Hagler was stripped of the WBA and IBF titles, as he "ducked" Herol to fight Sugar Ray Leonard.

From 85 - 92 Herol faced some terrific fighters, fights I will post up later in the thread, as I try to keep this chronological.
But with names like Kalambay, McCallum, Jackson on his slate as well as late efforts at higher weights against Pazienza and Brewer, Herol was the best fighter these isles have produced who has not lifted a world title....and as we'll see, he was very unfortunate not to do so.



maxresdefault.jpg


ps I'm going to try to manage this thread to keep it in order.. but comments and discussion more than welcome @One to watch @Lunny @Bogotazo @Chatty @Chinny @Bolo @Shadowboxer @DaveT @David Ike Ibeabuchi @Drew @Zopilote @Jack_Ledger @SJS

Watched the Holmes fight, hadn't realised when I posted it it was stopped on a cut, which looked like it came from a head clash.
I hadn't given Holmes a round to that point, Holmes didn't look like he knew what to do with Herol, his footwork, upper body movement and ability to lauch quick two-handed counters were imp-ressive and IMO too much for Holmes.
Not that it mattered, Mickey Vann (with fucking hair, would you believe) stopped it for a TKO.

On another note, the two fights I've posted were the first I've watched Brendan Ingle in a corner since he passed, nice hearing his voice again.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Article by Buncey

A tale of sorcery and sadness: The tragic story of Herol Bomber Graham

From world title fights to stacking boxes in Asda and being sectioned with mental health issues: the sad story of a true British boxing great

Sport
herol-bomber-graham-3.jpg

Since retiring life has been tough on Graham and he tried to take his own life in 2009 ( Getty )
In the fighting life and times of Herol Bomber Graham there is a million-pound offer, a sickening punch, a glittering career, despair, collapse, attempted suicide and a stay or two in a mental health facility.
Graham is back in a locked room, sectioned again and even further away from his finest fighting days; he finished his boxing career long after his beautiful skills had faded, replaced by the bravery that left him in his present state. Sure, he easily passed the medical tests, was glowingly declared fit to box in the last years of his career. It was his ear, they said, when he stumbled and slurred. There was nothing wrong, they lied.

However, Graham had that truly brutal fighting affliction: he was ‘gone’, not a medical term but as damning as any diagnosis in a sport aimed at wrecking a man’s senses. Graham fought too long for the riches he was denied and deserved - perhaps he missed out on more than any other modern British pugilist. It’s a horribly cruel tale and now Graham sits alone, medicated and increasingly helpless in his failure. His story goes something like this.



herol-bomber-graham.jpg

Graham's finished with 48 wins in 54 fights (Getty)
In 1978 at 18 he won the British amateur title, turned professional later that year, won the British, European and Commonwealth titles in an unbeaten sequence of 38 fights that lasted until 1987. Graham had the great whispering guru Brendan Ingle at his side, a unique and often frustrating pairing who refused to bow to Mickey Duff and his legal cartel. “It was hard to do business with them,” Duff insisted. “I wanted the best deal for my fighters and Duff never liked that,” countered Ingle.


“I would take Herol to the working men’s clubs and ask if anybody thought they could hit him,” said Ingle. “Then I would tell them that Herol couldn’t hit them! They all put the gloves on and loved it and they came out for the fights. Nobody ever hit him, never.” Graham won and defended his titles in Sheffield.
He was for too long the number one contender for Marvin Hagler’s world middleweight title; Graham stopped or knocked out 18 of the 24 men he beat during Hagler’s reign. Hagler and his people ignored Graham, even when Barney Eastwood, the Belfast bookie and boxing manager, offered the American a million pounds for a fight in January of 1987. In February Hagler was stripped and Graham still had to wait as the shameful series of delays continued.

herol-bomber-graham-2.jpg

Graham, pictured in 2012, is struggling with money (Getty)
Sweet Herol lost for the first time in a bad-tempered, confusing brawl with the Italian Sumbu Kalambay in May of 1987. Ingle was not in the corner on the night. “I’d have won that fight if Brendan had still been in my corner,” Graham said and he was right. Kalambay got a tight decision, Graham boxed the wrong fight and five months later the Italian won the world title. Graham had to wait another two years before he got his chance.
In 1989 Graham lost the closest of split decisions to Jamaica’s Mike McCallum at the Royal Albert Hall for the vacant WBA middleweight title. Ingle was back in the corner but so was Eastwood and their arguing, contradictory advice, open hatred of each other left Graham in turmoil. “I looked forward to the round, so that I could have a break from their sixty-seconds of screaming,” Graham said. That sad night in London Graham was 29, had been a professional for 11 years and had lost just once in 42 fights. They are a set of statistics that will never happen again, a perfect storm of hardship, bad luck and cruelty.

By 1990 it was not just the American world champions avoiding Graham but the high-profile trio of British boxers Chris Eubank, Nigel Benn and Michael Watson all got on with their lucrative business without inviting Graham to the party. “Nobody wanted to willingly fight me, I had to wait and then take what was offered,” added Graham. There is not one solid story that I believe about Graham refusing a fight - he was just bloody avoided.
herol-bomber-graham-5.jpg

Graham (left) ended his career in defeat to Charles Brewer (Getty)
In 1990 Graham was just seconds away from winning the vacant WBC middleweight title when he met Julian Jackson of the Virgin Islands in Spain. Jackson had lost just once in 41 fights and had knocked out 38 of his victims. “I knew nothing about him, but I was told he was blind as a f****** bat,” said Graham. The fight was in Spain because Jackson had retina problems and could not box in Britain; Jackson struggled to touch Graham, looked pitiful, his left eye was closed and at the end of round three the doctor and referee told Jackson the next was his last round. In the fourth, Graham made one mistake, was caught and out cold before he hit the floor.

Graham had one more world title fight, his last night in the ring in 1998 when he was winning but ran out of steam against Charles Brewer for the IBF super-middleweight title. In Atlantic City that night there were tears in the dressing room, a rehearsal for the harrowing decades to follow. It was over, he finished with 48 wins in 54 fights during 20 years as a professional.

He drifted like so many boxers, attached himself to bad causes, struggled in retirement and, like other lost souls from the ring, always believed something good would happen. It seldom does - I could have told him that boxing takes so much and is reluctant to give back, and when boxers tell you the fighting is the easy bit they are not joking.
herol-bomber-graham-4.jpg

(Getty)
He was sectioned in 2009 after failing with brandy and a knife to end his life. In 2014 he was loading trucks for ASDA, getting paid eight-quid an hour. My cousin worked with him and tried to make sure that Herol did nothing. “It’s Herol Bomber Graham, he can’t do that work - he’s a legend,” he told me.
The last year has been harsh. Graham’s partner Karen has terminal cancer, they are skint and Herol had been sectioned once again. There is a page for donations, something for people to say they have done.
Herol Bomber Graham is the latest of the heroes I started writing about over thirty years ago to have a living obituary. A donation will help, but it is surely too late to change the life of one of British boxing’s modern treasures.
To donate to Herol Bomber Graham's JustGiving page, please follow this link
 
Country Flag
Mexico
Article by Buncey

A tale of sorcery and sadness: The tragic story of Herol Bomber Graham

From world title fights to stacking boxes in Asda and being sectioned with mental health issues: the sad story of a true British boxing great

Sport
herol-bomber-graham-3.jpg

Since retiring life has been tough on Graham and he tried to take his own life in 2009 ( Getty )
In the fighting life and times of Herol Bomber Graham there is a million-pound offer, a sickening punch, a glittering career, despair, collapse, attempted suicide and a stay or two in a mental health facility.
Graham is back in a locked room, sectioned again and even further away from his finest fighting days; he finished his boxing career long after his beautiful skills had faded, replaced by the bravery that left him in his present state. Sure, he easily passed the medical tests, was glowingly declared fit to box in the last years of his career. It was his ear, they said, when he stumbled and slurred. There was nothing wrong, they lied.

However, Graham had that truly brutal fighting affliction: he was ‘gone’, not a medical term but as damning as any diagnosis in a sport aimed at wrecking a man’s senses. Graham fought too long for the riches he was denied and deserved - perhaps he missed out on more than any other modern British pugilist. It’s a horribly cruel tale and now Graham sits alone, medicated and increasingly helpless in his failure. His story goes something like this.



herol-bomber-graham.jpg

Graham's finished with 48 wins in 54 fights (Getty)
In 1978 at 18 he won the British amateur title, turned professional later that year, won the British, European and Commonwealth titles in an unbeaten sequence of 38 fights that lasted until 1987. Graham had the great whispering guru Brendan Ingle at his side, a unique and often frustrating pairing who refused to bow to Mickey Duff and his legal cartel. “It was hard to do business with them,” Duff insisted. “I wanted the best deal for my fighters and Duff never liked that,” countered Ingle.


“I would take Herol to the working men’s clubs and ask if anybody thought they could hit him,” said Ingle. “Then I would tell them that Herol couldn’t hit them! They all put the gloves on and loved it and they came out for the fights. Nobody ever hit him, never.” Graham won and defended his titles in Sheffield.
He was for too long the number one contender for Marvin Hagler’s world middleweight title; Graham stopped or knocked out 18 of the 24 men he beat during Hagler’s reign. Hagler and his people ignored Graham, even when Barney Eastwood, the Belfast bookie and boxing manager, offered the American a million pounds for a fight in January of 1987. In February Hagler was stripped and Graham still had to wait as the shameful series of delays continued.

herol-bomber-graham-2.jpg

Graham, pictured in 2012, is struggling with money (Getty)
Sweet Herol lost for the first time in a bad-tempered, confusing brawl with the Italian Sumbu Kalambay in May of 1987. Ingle was not in the corner on the night. “I’d have won that fight if Brendan had still been in my corner,” Graham said and he was right. Kalambay got a tight decision, Graham boxed the wrong fight and five months later the Italian won the world title. Graham had to wait another two years before he got his chance.
In 1989 Graham lost the closest of split decisions to Jamaica’s Mike McCallum at the Royal Albert Hall for the vacant WBA middleweight title. Ingle was back in the corner but so was Eastwood and their arguing, contradictory advice, open hatred of each other left Graham in turmoil. “I looked forward to the round, so that I could have a break from their sixty-seconds of screaming,” Graham said. That sad night in London Graham was 29, had been a professional for 11 years and had lost just once in 42 fights. They are a set of statistics that will never happen again, a perfect storm of hardship, bad luck and cruelty.

By 1990 it was not just the American world champions avoiding Graham but the high-profile trio of British boxers Chris Eubank, Nigel Benn and Michael Watson all got on with their lucrative business without inviting Graham to the party. “Nobody wanted to willingly fight me, I had to wait and then take what was offered,” added Graham. There is not one solid story that I believe about Graham refusing a fight - he was just bloody avoided.
herol-bomber-graham-5.jpg

Graham (left) ended his career in defeat to Charles Brewer (Getty)
In 1990 Graham was just seconds away from winning the vacant WBC middleweight title when he met Julian Jackson of the Virgin Islands in Spain. Jackson had lost just once in 41 fights and had knocked out 38 of his victims. “I knew nothing about him, but I was told he was blind as a f****** bat,” said Graham. The fight was in Spain because Jackson had retina problems and could not box in Britain; Jackson struggled to touch Graham, looked pitiful, his left eye was closed and at the end of round three the doctor and referee told Jackson the next was his last round. In the fourth, Graham made one mistake, was caught and out cold before he hit the floor.

Graham had one more world title fight, his last night in the ring in 1998 when he was winning but ran out of steam against Charles Brewer for the IBF super-middleweight title. In Atlantic City that night there were tears in the dressing room, a rehearsal for the harrowing decades to follow. It was over, he finished with 48 wins in 54 fights during 20 years as a professional.

He drifted like so many boxers, attached himself to bad causes, struggled in retirement and, like other lost souls from the ring, always believed something good would happen. It seldom does - I could have told him that boxing takes so much and is reluctant to give back, and when boxers tell you the fighting is the easy bit they are not joking.
herol-bomber-graham-4.jpg

(Getty)
He was sectioned in 2009 after failing with brandy and a knife to end his life. In 2014 he was loading trucks for ASDA, getting paid eight-quid an hour. My cousin worked with him and tried to make sure that Herol did nothing. “It’s Herol Bomber Graham, he can’t do that work - he’s a legend,” he told me.
The last year has been harsh. Graham’s partner Karen has terminal cancer, they are skint and Herol had been sectioned once again. There is a page for donations, something for people to say they have done.
Herol Bomber Graham is the latest of the heroes I started writing about over thirty years ago to have a living obituary. A donation will help, but it is surely too late to change the life of one of British boxing’s modern treasures.
To donate to Herol Bomber Graham's JustGiving page, please follow this link
What a shame. Hope he finds some peace.
 

Lunny

Shadowboxer's Nonsense Football Lottery Champ 2021
Staff member
This thread is ATG already. It was mentioned on here somewhere recently but Shuler has to be Hearns most underrated win.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
This thread is ATG already. It was mentioned on here somewhere recently but Shuler has to be Hearns most underrated win.

We'll never truly know but he looked very good against Kinchen who went on to carve out a half decent career.
Who know's what would have happened, but it's a solid 1 in the W column for Hearns.
Of course with a fighter like Hearns it easy to dismiss a win like that.

Interestingly, he qualified to fight in the Olympics but didn't get to fight in Moscow due to the US boycott,
Then entered the Hearns fight defending the NABF, when he was WBA, WBC and IBF mandatory for Haglers titles and last 1m13s against a man Hagler had recently dispatched.
Then he hits a tractor on a motorbike.
This thread is turning into a tale of ATG misery and fucking woe.
 
I didn't know about this if I'm honest.
Between that and the lad in the lounge that was off to jail telling his 3 year old he "is going away to learn things so he will be a better Daddy as far as he knows" this site has had me close to tears twice in as many days.

Yeah that struck home.

Fuck man that would kill me to tell my son that.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
As I said earlier, the year was fairly well dominated on the world scene by Hagler vs Hearns.
James Shuler and Herol Graham had edged themselves ever closer to mandatory positions for Hagler fights that would never transpire.

Doug Dewitt fell foul of the scorecards twice, results that might have you believe that this would be the last mention of him on this thread...far from it.
http://boxrec.com/en/event/93659/43313 - He drew with Don Lee in March
http://boxrec.com/en/event/422388/43312 - and lost unanimously to Robbie Sims, a pair that will meet again at 'world level' later

Ayub Kalule won the vacant EBU European title and defended it
http://boxrec.com/en/event/68635/115147 - Stopping Pierre Joly in June
http://boxrec.com/en/event/68636/115148 - And what appears to be an all action SD win over middleweight legend Sumbu Kalambay

Sumbu Kalambay Had been on a 32 fight winning run including
http://boxrec.com/en/event/419055/126795 - Tony Harrison in March
http://boxrec.com/en/event/27133/126793 - Before losing to Duane Thomas in April
Kalambay came back with three more wins
http://boxrec.com/en/event/75352/126789 - Including an SD win for the Italian fighter against Giovanni Demarco
He ended the year on the aforementioned loss to Kalule, that I think I'll post as the video for this entry.

John "The Beast" Mugabe beat a couple of unfortunate souls up on route to a 25-0 record that earned him the Hagler shot in 86
http://boxrec.com/en/event/2672/1543 - Earl Harlgrove lasted 1m33s
http://boxrec.com/en/event/174445/1685 - While Bill Bradlet lasted 4 before giving up

John Collins appeared to be building a case, after a draw with Alex Ramos at the end of 84 he had 3 KO wins, two of them fairly impressive
http://boxrec.com/en/event/26659/246149 - Stopping 32-0 Mark Holmes, the only loss of his 39 fight career
http://boxrec.com/en/event/133332/246631 - And 5th round stoppage win against Mike Landini


Kalule vs Kalambay ends the year with a SD 12 rounder 6 days before Christmas. The video quality looks poor, but I want to see this one, 3 knockdowns so there should be some action


That almost wraps up 1985, but for one last special mention...
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Errol Christie vs Mark Kaylor

Errol Christie had won his last 7 fights by early KO (5 of them in the first 9 months of 85), racking up only 11 rounds in the process when he ran into controversy in the name of Mark Kaylor.

http://boxrec.com/en/event/20526/188587

Kaylor was accused of calling Christie and "ugly black bastard" as they faced off.
Much controversy ensued which turned the whole event into somewhat of a circus.
Fights in the carpark, appearances on breakfast tele, and guest appearances from borderline gangsters and hooligans.

I'll let our man Buncey tell you about it again
https://www.independent.co.uk/sport...istie-dead-tributes-steve-bunce-a7785306.html
 
Top