Davie's 60-86 bantamweight era thread

Davie

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Freddie Gilroy vs Johnny Caldwell.

1. 10-8 Gilroy. Starts at an electric pace and Caldwell is forced to touch down early. Not sure thebref called it but he was put on his arse.

2. 9-10 Caldwell. Another good action round, if a little scrappy. Gilroy a southpaw, compact and likes to go to the body and looks heavy handed. Caldwell has the feel of a looser better boxer and backs Gilroy up well but doesn't look as comfortable when Gilroy comes inside.

3. 10-9 Gilroy. Caldwell trying to rush in with fast attacks, 1 or 2 shots then tie up. Gilroy trying to counter him coming in and when he lands that back hand you understand Caldwells cautious approach. And when he can free his hands up inside he looks a punishing body puncher. Great wee fight this.

4. 10-9 Gilroy. Has the better of the early exchanges and he's the man trying to work in any position. Caldwell trying to slow the action. But Caldwell seems to have a little more success late when he makes room to work. Needs to keep that up, use his feet to box at distance, the tactic of falling in behind his attacks wasn't working for him.

5. 10-10 not a complete round and the action had slowed. Nothing much to separate them even from the action I saw

6. 9-10 Caldwell. Huge round for him, really uses the jab to good effect for the first time, keeps his distance better and grows in confidence as he sees the benefit of that. Starts to land the right, puts shots together and eventually cut Gilroy, who starts swinging wildly as he must notice the blood.

7. 9-10 Caldwell. Good close round. Gilroy looks like he's been sent out to jab and box then the first chance he gets to get inside and get in a tear up he does so. Caldwell boxing nicely second half, tees up some sharp accurate right hands.

8. 10-9 Gilroy. Both men tired and blood soaked, this is getting scrappy with them slugging out exchanges in the middle of the ring. The dogged persistence of Gilroy and his commitment to throw vicious backhands the difference.

9. 10-9 Girloy. Another hard fought, close and scrappy round. Throughout the commentary plead that this must be stopped as Caldwells face is a mess, you even hear a shout from outside the ring "look at the state of his eye" or something to that effect.

At the end of the round, the corner look at him and indicate to the ref that it's over and he goes over and raises Gilroy's hand.

@Bolo this is well worth a watch if you've never seen it
 

Davie

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After the Rollo win, Eder had another non-title run out against imaginatively named Sugar Ray, Suriname born Dutchman Henri April Richenel.
Another 2nd round stoppage.

His next non-title bout was a sterner test against no1 rated Japanese flyweight Sadao Yaoita.
Yaoita had recently lost to Eder's next title opponent Ramon Arias, taking him the 10 round distance.
He was also no1 ranked flyweight in the world and had previously taken legendary Pascal Perez 13 rounds, knocking him down in the 2nd.

Footage of the flyweight fight with Perez here
And here

"Eder Jofre 122 lbs beat Sadao Yaoita120 lbs by KO at 2:12 in round 10 of 10
  • Date:1961-07-26
    • Location: Ginásio Estadual do Ibirapuera, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
    • Referee: Antonio Ziravello
Yaoita, the number one world ranked flyweight, came into the ring weighing 120 pounds to Jofre's 121. He gave Jofre a good workout and was able to hold his own against a vastly superior fighter for nine rounds, and actually win a few of them in the process. But as the rounds wore on Jofre started to find the range with his deadly left hook. In the tenth and final round, Jofre landed solidly and Yaoita went down like he was shot. Then, to everyone's amazement, he got up at seven. But Jofre was not to be denied. He fired a short but devastating left hook to the jaw. Ten seconds later it was all over.'​
 
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Davie

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Eder Jofre vs Ramon Arias

Arias was next up to challenge for his title. Another flyweight, he had been the first Venezuelan to challenge for a world title when he too faced flyweight legend 47-0-1 Pascual Perez in only his 10th fight at the age of 22. He managed to take Perez the 15 round distance and this footage suggests he dragged himself off the canvas in a brutal 15 round battle.

Arias was still campaigning at flyweight shortly before the Jofre fight and held a 10 round decision win over Jofres previous opponent Sadao Yaoita only a couple months earlier.
Arias weighed in 114 for the bantamweight fight with Jofre and was stopped in the 7th having been floored twice.
I've found no footage but it appears it was one way traffic

boxing-news-clipping-2226-eder-jofre-vs-ramon-arias-cuban-boxing-with-kid-chocolate-kid-gavila...jpg
 
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Davie

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Exiting the 50's Alphonse Halimi had been number one then lost to Jose Becerra twice that installed the Mexican as the main man at the turn of the decade.
Becerra's loss to Eloy Sanches robbed Jofre of the chance to take on a top fighter and still lacking a truly top name opponent, this was the way the bantamweight rankings looked in the early 60's

Screenshot_20200513-171801_Samsung Internet.jpg

Halimi had got himself a portion of the vacated title which would have given him a highly rated win but Halimi losing to Caldwell meant that was the man he needed to beat to not only re-unify the titles but claim true champion status in the eye's of the rankings.
Here we see he sits number 1 but it is not until he faces Caldwell that he is elevated to champion.

His former victim Medel had also worked himself into number 2 slot and he would face him again in 62 to cement his position as Bantamweights undisputed top man.
 

Davie

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Eder Jofre ended 1961 with another routine non-title affair, knocking Portuguese Fernando Goncalves down in 5 and knocking him out in 8. Little more than a month later he was ready for another defence.

Eder Jofre vs John Caldwell.
I kind of skimmed over this earlier but I best stick it in it's chronologically correct slot.


"Date: 1962-01-18
World Bantamweight Title

  • Caldwell's manager jumped into the ring to stop the bout. Caldwell was knocked down in the 5th.
  • Photo #2
SAO PAULO - There was no gainsaying Jofre's superiority over Caldwell in the meeting of two previously unbeaten title claimants. Recognized as world champion by The Ring and the NBA, the shifty, sharpshooting 25-year-old Brazilian outclassed his 24-year-old rival, who had been accepted as title-holder by the European Boxing Union. After the first round, credited to Caldwell, Jofre was complete master of operations. Eder's stinging left jabs and jolting left hooks were too much for his Irish rival. In the third round he drew blood from Caldwell's nose, and in the fifth round he sent the Irishman toppling to the canvas for the count of three. From then on it was a question only of how long Caldwell would be able to last. The gritty little Irishman fought back stubbornly but could not match the Brazilian's speed and accurate punching. By the tenth round Caldwell was hopelessly beaten. Toward the end of the round he was dropped again, this time for nine, and was reeling helplessly when his manager jumped into the ring, stopping the fight with fifteen seconds of the round remaining. The bout refereed by former world featherweight champion Willie Pep attracted a sellout crowd of 20,000 to the Ibirapuera Stadium, the largest indoor attendance in South American boxing history. Thousands of others were unable to gain attendance."
 
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Davie

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Jose Medel

In the time since his 1960 loss to Jofre, he'd built up a good run with 1 draw, 9 wins and no defeats.

The run was littered with solid names that are now becoming very recognisable to me.
Manny Elias
Toluca Lopez
Hiram Bacalao (draw)
Herman Marquez
Hector Agundez
Felix Gutierez
Mitsunori Seki
Haruo Sakamoto.
Ignacio Pina
Sadao Yaoita

Every one a winning record and there was a Mexican and North American title in that run as well.
Medel had earned his place as Jofres main challenger
 

Davie

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An opponent Of Jose Medel in that period was Mitsunori Seki. Seki went on to be a very good featherweight challenging Saldivar twice and Howard Winstone. I watched the footage on them years back. He also faced Sugar Ramos for the featherweight title in 64

But just prior to the Medel fight, he faced Pone Kingpetch at flyweight



He'd face Chartchai Chionoi at bantamweight the following year so I'll see if I can find that.
 

Davie

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Next up for Jofre, defending his now undisputed crown, was Herman Marquez of Sonoro Mexico.
Presumably the father of Hernan Marquez also of Sonoro.

Herman had won his last 3 at the end of 1961, with a couple of decent wins in there as title eliminators.
I'm guessing he was made to wait with the unification happening early in 1962, but he got his shot in May of the same year.
Herman didn't do knockouts by the look of his record so he was probably always going to be in for a torrid time of it. But he'd mixed in decent company and had some half decent wins so he was not a keep bust fight, he had earned his tilt at the title.

The is no footage again, so I've just got the press cuttings from Boxrec.


"
Eder Jofre vs. Herman Marques

Eder Jofre 118 lbs beat Herman Marques 118 lbs by TKO at 2:15 in round 10 of 15
poster
World Bantamweight Title
  • Weights: Jofre 117?, Marques 118
  • Time: 2:15
  • Marques was down twice in the 10th.
"Eder Jofre retained his undisputed world bantamweight championship Friday night by stopping Herman Marquez in the 10th round of a scheduled 15 round fight. Jofre had been in trouble during the 8th and 9th rounds when the challenger began staggering him with rights to the head. Then Jofre stormed out to open the 10th and dropped Marquez in a neutral corner for a count of three and Jofre moved in again and sent him down with a left hook to the jaw. Referee Fred Apostoli did not complete the count but instead walked over and raised the champion's hand. The time was 2:15. Under California rules it was a KO. Many in the crowd thought that Marquez was going to stop Jofre as the 10th opened. But the champion shook Marquez with a right uppercut to the jaw and was the boss until Apostoli ended it." -United Press International
  • Referee Fred Apostoli denied when questioned that his stoppage of the bout was an over-reaction to the recent ring death of Benny 'Kid' Paret.
Unofficial scorecards
  • UPI - 6-5 Marquez
  • Oakland Tribune - 5-3 Marquez
Post fight comment
  • "They shouldn't have stopped the fight. Who was that ref anyway? They told us in the afternoon the three knockdown rule was waived. I went down on purpose the 1st time, you could see that. I wasn't hurt bad and I knew what I was doing all the time." -Herman Marquez"
 
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Davie

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The fight inspired a column in Sport Illustrated

Screenshot_20200514-230130_Samsung Internet.jpg

Screenshot_20200514-230219_Samsung Internet.jpg

Screenshot_20200514-231153_Samsung Internet.jpg
 
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Davie

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Eder Jofre vs Jose Medel 2


"Eder Jofre 118 lbs beat Jose Medel 117 lbs by KO at 1:11 in round 6 of 15
World Bantamweight Title
The 26-year-old tile holder was a 3-1 favorite and proved the odds were reasonable by the manner in which he handled his opponent who had fought ten fights without a loss since his last meeting with Jofre. Medel started off well but it didn't take long for Jofre to find the range and pepper his man almost at will. The first two rounds were rather dull as each fighter was feeling his way, but occasional spurts kept the fans on edge. But beginning the fourth round, Jofre having warmed up, started taking the play away from his opponent and thereafter it was all his way. He jabbed, hooked, cleverly avoided blows aimed at him, and landed many punches that hurt Medel. His attack was vicious and the speed with which he tossed blows, bewildered the Mexican challenger. After the fourth round it was merely a question how much longer the Mexican could stand the gaff. He was floored twice, once just before the bell sounded ending the fifth round and again in the sixth after he was dropped again and counted out in 1:30 of that frame. A right to the chin ended the fight. Jofre proved again he is one of the world's outstanding champions."​
 
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Davie

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Watching that footage, for all there was of if, Jofre was well in control.
The slow motion replay of the seconds leading up to the knockdown, Jofre is beautifully composed, bullying Medel while calmly ducking and dropping out of range of shots.
 

Davie

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As we tie up 1962, it is worth mentioning a great fighter that would never show his greatness at 118lb.
Lanky Panamanian, Ismael Laguna, ended 1962 the no1 ranked bantamweight behind Jofre.
He had reached that position on the back of a 17-0-0 record, including a 4th round stoppage win over the man that dethroned Becerra and faced Jofre for his first title, Eloy Sanchez .

Screenshot_20200516-151604_Samsung Internet.jpg

Laguna would go on to find his greatness at featherweight and lightweight, so a fight with Jofre was never to be.
 

Davie

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Beginning of 1963 and we can see another great name beginning to work his way into the picture.
Japanese terrier, Fighting Harada. But Jofres supremacy would be challenged for a few fights yet.

Screenshot_20200516-151507_Samsung Internet.jpg

Eder Jofre has another Japanese fighter in his path, in Katsutoshi Aoki.
Aoki's record, at first glance looks solid with 31-1-1 and wins over Leo Esparza and Pierre Rollo.
 

Davie

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Eder Jofre vs Katsutoshi Aoki





"​
Eder Jofre 118 lbs beat Katsutoshi Aoki118 lbs by KO at 2:12 in round 3 of 15

Eder Jofre vs.Katsutoshi Aoki 04/04/1963
TOKYO- Fortified by sukiyaki and tempura (shellfish) washed down with hot rice wine or cold beer, the 10,000 wildly partisan fans in Kutamae Sumo Arena shrieked encouragement to their little hero, Katsutoshi Aoki. For two rounds, the 20-year-old Japanese challenger had been battering bantamweight champion Eder Jofre with punishing rights and lefts, pinning him against the ropes with flurries of blows. Waiting tensely during the rest period, anxious ringsiders with cameras poised stood ready to capture every detail of what appeared to be a staggering upset in the making.

Jofre, who had just squeezed under the 118-pound limit, moved out cautiously as the bell sounded for the third and for about a minute the challenger continued to rip into him. Then the flashy Brazilian started stepping up the pace. This was more like him. Aoki, 117 3/4, sensed the change and tried to pour it on. Suddenly, Jofre nailed him with a booming left that sent him crashing to the canvas. The punch was a beauty. It traveled only a few inches but Jofre followed through with a wide sweeping motion - like a pitcher whipping a fireball across the plate. Getting up groggily at the count of five, the surprised Japanese wobbled on rubbery legs while taking the mandatory eight-count and threw a couple of feeble blows at Jofre's head. Stepping back, the champ carefully measured his foe and crumpled him with another sledge-hammer left to the side. The blow knocked the last puff of steam from the game challenger and he was counted out at 2:12.

The spectators sat in stunned silence for a few seconds, then rose to their feet in a frenzy - showering the ring with seat cushions in typical Oriental tribute to a great champion. It was the champion's 14th straight kayo and his sixth defense of the title. Recovering rapidly from his punishment, the resilient young Japanese shrugged his thin shoulders in disappointment. Later he said he had felt the first knockdown punch, "but I didn't know what hit me the second time. That man has a terrific punch."
 

Davie

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The first bit of footage, from Japan, shows about 20 seconds of action, with Aoki the aggressor. Doesn't show the stoppage. Hmmm

The second bit of footage is Japanese also, but shows it in a more balanced light. And Aoki does come flying out the blocks, trying to take Jofre out and he does put him in his shell a fair bit.

Jofre ends him, putting him down with two body shots.


There is footage of a 64 fight between Aoki and Harada, that should be good fun.
 

Davie

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Next up, I have stumbled upon a piece of footage selling itself as a double bill.

First Jose Casas, that Eder faced twice in September and October of 58, followed by his next title challenger in 63, Filipino Johnny Jamito.


"MANILA – Jofre’s 7th defense was more annoying than it was dangerous. Jamito, 23, fighting before 25,000 excited countrymen In Quezon City’s indoor Araneta Coliseum, kept the people happy in the early rounds by darting in, out and around the champion, peppering him with left jabs, landing sharp punches in close and clinching or taking off when Eder showed signs of life. But in the ninth the roof began caving in on Johnny when Jofre landed a terrific left hook and Jamito had all he could do to stay on his feet. In the eleventh, a right to the body knocked the challenger into the ropes. On the rebound, Jamito grabbed Eder by the waist, but the champion pushed him away and exploded a lightning-fast left-right to the chin. Jamito landed on his knees. His eyes were closed, his head bent low. The bell clanged before referee Antonio Ziravallo could start a count, but it was obvious that Jamito was through for the night. It was stopped between rounds eleven and twelve, with Eder way ahead on points, unmarked and untired.

Ringside, Manila (Special to The Ring) – Eder Jofre may have fought his last fight as world bantamweight champion. The featherweight title is now his goal, and a match with Sugar Ramos in Los Angeles later this summer is a strong possibility. The classy Brazilian admitted after stopping Filipino Johnny Jamito in the steamy indoor Areneta Coliseum in suburban Quezon City that not only had he run out of logical challengers for the 118-pound laurels, but that he’d been having increasing difficulty making the class limit. At original weighing-in time here for Jamito, Jofre was a half-pound overweight. He was given a half-hour in which to take off the surplus avoirdupois and he came in at 117 ¾. Jamito weighed 117 ½. A turnout estimated at 25,000 saw the South American score his fourteenth consecutive knockout in polishing off rugged Jamito. It was a typical Jofre fight. The Brazilian was content to take things easily in the early rounds, permitting Jamito to set the pace, keep the champion off-balance with left jabs and score well in the infighting. But Eder was merely biding his time. When he settled down to serious business in the ninth round, it was obvious that the fight didn’t have much longer to go. In that session Jofre staggered Jamito with a left hook, but the Filipino managed to last out the round. Jofre continued his heavy hitting in the tenth, and it paid off in the eleventh. A right to the body sent Jamito stumbling into the ropes. He tried to hang on, but Jofre pulled free and cut loose with a vicious left-right combination to the chin. Jamito slumped to the canvas and knelt there, head bowed. As Referee Antonio Zivavello of Brazil was escorting Jofre to a neutral corner, the bell rang, ending the round before a count could be started. When the gong sounded for the twelfth round, Jamito was in no condition to leave his corner, and the result went down as a 12th-round T.K.O. for the champion. [The Ring, Jul 63 - page 48]"
 
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Davie

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That footage didn't show us a huge amount.
Bit of a Rocky montage at the start with some training and highlights reel KO's.
The Casas footage shows him being far to slick against an outmatched opponent.

The Jamito footage shows around a minute of him finishing him off but none of the earlier reported good work by the Filipino fighter, which is a real shame. This fight appears to have tested Eder for a period at least
 

Davie

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Bernardo Caraballo


Eder Jofres next opponent, according to the Ring annual rankings, had reached no5 in the Bantamweight rankings. Even after the Jofre fight he would rise to 4th in 65, 4th in 66 and 3rd in 67 before losing to Chucho Castillo.

But staying in 64, he had earned the rank on a 31-0-1 record, including a Colombian flyweight title, multiple Spanish and EBU titlist Minoun Ben Ali, a 37 year old Pasual Perez and Pierre Roo.
In 64 he defeated Chartchai Chionoi and Manny Elias to get his shot.
 
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Davie

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Eder Jofre vs Bernardo Caraballo

At last, a decent chunk of footage


"Eder Jofre vs. Bernardo Caraballo
(Redirected from Fight:19037)​
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Eder Jofre vs. Bernardo Caraballo.jpg
Eder Jofre118 lbs beat Bernardo Caraballo118 lbs by KO at 2:50 in round 7 of 15
  • Date:1964-11-27
    • Location: Estadio Nemesio Camacho, Bogota, Colombia
    • Referee: Barney Ross
BOGOTA - World Bantamweight Champion Eder Jofre, Brazil, chalked up his eighth successful defense of his title by knocking out number four ranked Bernardo Caraballo, Colombia, in the 7th round. Jofre is clearly establishing himself as the best fighter, pound for pound, in the ring today. Jofre has scored 47 wins and 3 draws in 50 bouts. Caraballo became the 37th KO victim of Jofre. Caraballo was unbeaten in 43 fights. This was Jofre's first fight in 18 months. Caraballo, a crack combination puncher, could do nothing against Jofre who attacked him from the beginning with long lefts, stinging combinations and stiff right hands. Jofre was well ahead on all scorecards when he finally kayoed Caraballo in the seventh wound. It was his 17th straight knockout.​
Greatness in Our Time By Eduardo Moncada​
Brilliant world bantamweight champion proves again that even our generation can produce supermen'
BOGOTA, COLUMBIA, Ringside'​
The piercing voice of one pecan-complexioned women sitting at ringside cut through the din at Nemesio Camacho Stadium like a surgeon's scalpel.​
"Get up honey! Please get up!" screamed Zunilda Caraballo.​
Up in the ring her husband, brave Bernardo Caraballo, strove and strained to obey Zunilda's frantic pleas. He never made it. At referee Barney Ross' count of ten, Caraballo's exhausted punch-numbed body was still squatting on the canvas, leaning limply against the ropes.​
Moments later, the announcer told Mrs. Caraballo-and 32,000 other heartbroken Columbians that their Bernardo had been knocked out, that Eder Jofre had won in two minutes and 50 seconds of the 7th round and was still the bantamweight champion of the world.​
Showing none of the rustiness one would expect of a fighter who hadn't fought in eighteen months, Jofre, 117 3/4, controlled the battle from the opening bell as he jockeyed Caraballo through the first four rounds, testing his speedy foe's reflexes, defenses and power. In these sessions, Eder alternately played the role of hunter and hunted, first spraying Bernardo's face and body with thumping jabs and swooshing digs, then skittering out of range before the Columbian dancing-master could muster a counter attack. Caraballo, also 117 3/4, held his own during these opening twelve minutes with a flashing left jab that reddened Jofre's forehead and nose, adroit footwork and occasional right-hand salvos.​
But by the fifth, Jofre had his man sized up, and astute ringsiders could see that the end was only a matter of time. Satisfied that Caraballo couldn't hurt him, the champion stepped up the pace in this round and began pinpointing his punches. A barrage of lefts just before the bell had Bernardo gasping. The storm continued through the sixth and into the seventh as Jofre poured on the coals. Easily riding safely through a volley of desperation rights early in the 7th, Jofre sandbagged his now groggy opponent against the ropes, shot across a blazing left hook to head and followed with two blurring rights that exploded against Caraballo's chin and dropped the stunned hometowner seat-first on the canvas for the fight's first-and-last-knockdown.​
Caraballo, beaten for the first time in 41 fights (he's had one draw), joined his countrymen in heartbreak after referee Ross completed the formality of counting him out. "I did my best," he sobbed in his dressing room. "It wasn't enough." With that he tenderly put his arm around his wife and walked out into the night, glumly followed by his manager, Socrates Cruz.​
As was to be expected, there was mad jubilation in Jofre's quarters. Said Jofre, whose seventh defense of the 118-pound title brought his win-lose-draw record to 46-0-3 (39 knockouts), "It was an easy fight. I knew I had him when I hurt him with that left hook in the fifth round. I was feeling him out and trying to tire him in the first four rounds. Everything went according to plan. Caraballo is a good fighter, but he has lots to learn."​
Besides the thrill of victory, Jofre had another reason to be jubilant. A reason that is spelled D-O-L-L-A-R-S. Guaranteed a tax free $50,000 for the fight, the whooping turnout which tickled the turnstiles to the tune of $200,000 was expected to up his take home bundle to $65,000. Which is plenty for everyone to ne happy about. We?d have been hysterical."​
 

Davie

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I think it says a lot that in his last 3 fights, he defended HIS title against a Colombian in Bogota, a Filipino in Manilla and a Japanese in Tokyo.

He had one in Brazil and one against a Mexican American in his home town California
He also faced Arias in Venezuela and Sanchez in California

You were right though @Bolo
He never came near Belfast for Caldwell
 
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