Davie's 60-86 bantamweight era thread

Davie

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That's me up to 1980 with everything. I have as much footage as I can find for Jorge Lujan and the WBA and now covered the next champion in Jeff Chandler

The WBC is in the hands of Lupe Pintor and I have everything I could find on Johnny Owen ahead of a fairly tragic few years of the WBC bantamweight title, between Johnny's death in the ring, Pintor vacating in 83 due to a serious car accident and then Albert Davila vs Kiko Bejines which results in yet another fatality as the Mexican dies of injuries sustained in his title attempt.
 

Davie

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Lupe Pintor vs Alberto Sandoval


View attachment 24516

View attachment 24517

Lupe Pintor 116 lbs beat Alberto Sandoval 118 lbs by TKO at 1:19 in round 12 of 15
Notes
  • Pintor collected $100,000, and Sandoval $25,000.
  • Sandoval, the WBC's No. 10 contender, had just one good round, the first, when he successfully danced and jabbed against the slower, more cautious champion.
  • Pintor scored heavily with hooks throughout the fight.
  • Pintor had controlled the bout most of the way, and stopped Sandoval with a flurry of punches that had him staggering when referee Carlos Padilla decided the challenger could take no more.

1. 9-10 Sandoval. Pintor sizing him up but hasn't got started. Sandoval snappy with his shots, lots of decent jabs and a right hand gets throw well

2. 9-10 Sandoval he boxed really well for 2 minutes 30, with a great fast jab, landed the right twice and staying out of trouble. But Pintor landed 2 rights himself late and they hurt. You could have given him the round on effectiveness of those shots

3. 10-9 Pintor. Big round, looked like he had his eye in early but Sandoval catches him with a right to the side 9f the head while off balance and he nearly goes over. Pintor works his way into the fight then nails him with a right uppercut and left hook that sends him reeling to the ropes, almost has him over twice after that. How the ref never gave anyone a count in a mystery. He could have stopped it right before the bell

4. 10-9 Pintor. He seems in control now, he times shots in between Sandoval's. He throws, pauses a fraction then gets between Sandovals shots. Other than that scored a few nice single right hands. Sandoval scored a couple of those himself

5. 10-9 Pintor, funny round where Sandoval landing more, busy with an accurate jab early but nothing on it. Pintor slowly warms into the round, picking up steam, a lot of his shots are slipped or blocked but everything that does get through is hurtful and rocks Sandovals head right back.

6. 9-10 Sandoval. Both start at a fast pace and there are more power shots thrown. We get a lot of missing through much of the round. Sandoval closes well, he's landing more than the jab now but calling them power shots would be generous but he really is making Lupe miss a lot

7. 9-10 Sandoval, you can't knock what he is doing here, good solid defence with the guard, good movement to keep him out of reach of the plodding Pintor, fast repetitive jab breaking Lupe's rhythm and picking fast light shot to score before getting out of bother. Lupe just walking through shots and missing a lot

8. 9-10 Sandoval close round, Pintor came out moving forward with intent, trying to cut off the ring better than he has but Sandoval gets on his toes, picks his shots well again and actually tuirns Pintors head with a left hook late on. Pintor with some late success to make it a very tight round.

9. 10-9 Pintor, Sandoval comes out and stands his ground, putting together some showy combinations and big winging shots. Pintor eventually catches him with a huge left hook that slows him down and changes the momentum of the round. Later he lands more hard shots on a more static Sandoval including another couple hard left hooks that look like they've changed the momentum of the whole fight

10. 10-9 Pintor, much better from him, closing Sandoval down landing the harder shots, Sandoval still giving his all but he is under pressure now that the heavier hitter is now getting him in range constantly

11. 10-9 Pintor. A really good back and forth round, both landing good shots, Pintors obviously more effective. Sandoval looked to have a second wind coming out on his toes again but that dried up as the round went on and is the reason he lost the round, can't win this flat footed

12. TKO Pintor. He's a great finisher, hurts Sandoval with a combination on the ropes, goes after him as he spins of and keeps landing hard shots from all angles. Just keeps on throwing heavy punches, good shot variety, everything getting through. The ref thinks about it, eventually Sandoval turns his back and the ref steps in.

105-104 Pintor at the time of stoppage
Now I gave Sandoval a couple close one and felt that he landed enough volume and was elusive enough to overcome Pintors heavy handedness in those close rounds but 2 or 3 of those rounds were absolute no brainers. But the refs gave this an almost shut out. I can't see how judge Rudy Ortega gets 110-98?

The fight in the end felt wider than 1 point, purely down to Sandoval being hurt on more than one occasion but scoring this on boxing he merited at least a couple rounds
 
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Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Johnny Owen vs Wayne Evans BBBoC bantamweight title 06.04.1978

Time to get a bit of Background on the Merthyr matchstick


View attachment 24523

Only partial rounds and some of the rounds missing. Owen has a huge height and reach advantage but despite the matchstick frame, he looks the more powerful hitter in there. Evans looks crude technically and is wide open when he throws his hands, seems everytime he throws more than a jab, O=wen tags him with a right hand.
Evans does catch him a cracker in the 5th, pretty wild punching style but catches Owen and does stun him.
Owen almost knocks him over with the right that rocks his head right back in the 8th, he goes one further and flattens him in the 9th with the same shot
The rest of the fight is a fairly relentless barrage from Owen, by the time the finish comes, he's getting to him and Evans looks hurt, almost turns away as the last blow drops him and the ref waves it off immediately, Evans looked fairly well done.
Not much to gauge Owen by as his opponent was fairly limited.
 

Davie

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Johnny Owen vs Paul Ferreri (one for @Spider )


Owen and Ferreri both tall for the weight, Ferreri gives him a southpaw test. Both look to have a patient boxing style early, content to work at range with Owen primarily leading with Ferreri looking for the counters
Ferreri works well when they do mix at close quarters, scoring hooks and moving his head as he throws making it hard for the long limbed Owen to nail down, his success inside will give cause for concern with Pintor coming up. Owen does seem to be looking more and more to keep it at the range that suits him and Ferrari doesn't have the engine to stay in and work.
Round 8 (and the couple after that) looked a clear Ferreri round from the footage there, some nice counters and able to score well in exchanges, Owen dropping the pace a bit as he had set a fast tempo to this point
The footage ends with parts of round 13 and 15, Owen took over at the end, able to maintain a faster pace that Ferreri could hang with and boxing better than he had in the mid fight spell, Ferreri gives it a god to keep up with him in the last but still lost it for me.

This was a far sterner test with Ferreri looking technically and physically a far better challenge for Owen than Evans was. Experienced and skilful, he took a good few of the rounds I saw there. Ferreri had fought world champions and this was a test for Owen to see if he was ready for one.
He would have a further 10 fights over the next 2 years before reaching the title holder. He losses his next for the EBU, returns to domestics level and wins them all regaining his British and commonwealth titles, until he has another go at the European champion, this time winning, before a final British and commonwealth defence to John Feeney.

At 24 years of age he faced Lupe Pintor, which I will put up next.
 

Davie

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Lupe Pintor vs Johnny Owen - 19-09-1980 WBC bantamweight world title


1610602107993.png


"
The tragic tale of Johnny Owen and how it left a scar over Mexican boxing

Owen was Welsh, British, Commonwealth and European champion when he travelled to Los Angeles to try to add the world title

Steve Bunce@bigdaddybunce
Monday 06 November 2017 13:19

1610602179073.png


Johnny Owen once asked his trainer not to put any cream over or cover a slight abrasion on his cheek after a British title fight. “It shows I’m a boxer,” he said.
Owen was the impossibly thin young Welshman, dubbed the Matchstick Man, the one with the large cartoon ears and a voice seldom heard above the distant buzz of birds, cars and men chattering.

“I’ve known Johnny since he was a baby and he’s never been out with a girl in his life. He’s dedicated to boxing, he doesn’t bother with girlfriends,” said Dai Gardiner, Owen’s manager, in 1978. It was a dedication with some glory away from any glitz.

In early September 1980 Owen arrived, with his devoted father Dick, a man of seemingly endless love for his son, in California for a world title fight against Lupe Pintor. They shared a room at the Gala Motor Hotel in a part of Los Angeles that only the brave, the homeless, the addicted and hopeful from Merthyr Tydfil ever knew.


Pintor was a Mexican idol at the Olympic Auditorium in a part of Los Angeles known as Little Mexico and his bantamweight world title fight with Owen was sold out, possibly packed with a few thousand extra on the night. When Owen arrived at the venue riot police were prowling, a rancid atmosphere of intimidation and hate was the backdrop.

In Owen’s changing room the chants of “Lupe, Lupe, Lupe” were rattling the furniture. Owen was the calmest man in the room, which is often the case in big fights. A year earlier Owen had fought 15 rounds in a bullring in Spain against a Spanish boxer who had failed the weight and was still allowed to box for the European title. The Seventies and Eighties are packed with abuses against travelling British boxers. On that night in Spain Owen lost a disgraceful decision and had to face a vicious mob; the local police had assaulted the assigned British Boxing Board of Control official and then placed him under armed guard at ringside. In the ring the Spanish boxer had a substance openly smeared on his gloves and this temporarily blinded Owen. It was harsh, but ideal preparation for Little Mexico.

1610602241847.png

In the filthy changing room at the Olympic Auditorium the wait for the call to the ring continued. “Johnny had no nerves at all and I was a very proud man,” said Dick. The walk to the ring was not a pantomime of nastiness and served as a violent warning for what would happen at the end of the fight. Pintor, by the way, was then and remains a Mexican idol.


Owen was trailing on all three scorecards in the fifteen-round fight when the bell for twelfth sounded. The canvas was splattered with blood, Owen had been swallowing his own blood since round five from a cut inside his bottom lip, dropped heavily in round nine and sent crashing twice more to the sodden canvas in round twelve. The final knockdown is arguably the single most disturbing image in British boxing history; I have watched it for you and listened to the men that were there talking about it. It will never leave you if you watch it.

Poor Johnny was out cold on the canvas, folded over his legs at first like a butchered giraffe. There was an ancient stretcher, no resuscitation equipment and somebody tried smelling salts. His body was placed like a sacrifice on the stretcher with tender care by his father and others in the corner, and then they faced a gauntlet with their silent and still boy. The men carrying the stretcher were abused, had their pockets picked, were hit, kicked and had urine in beer cups thrown over them. They screamed back in hate, carried the kid and made it through to the ambulance.
The body of Johnny Owen was first operated on at the Lutheran Hospital on Hope Street at 11:30pm on 19 September and it took four hours to scrape away the clot on his brain. The twilight wait, a dreadful game of silence, teary visitors, doctors without salvation in their words and days holding the boxer’s hand during the depth of a coma dragged on and on. Owen’s mother, Edith, arrived two days later and she sat with Dick in pitiful watch over their son for nearly two months.

There were scares, few positive signs and boxing continued; Pintor was back in Mexico City and suffering. “He told me he cried all the time,” Dick said in 2002 after an extraordinary film was made, bringing the father and a broken fighter together. There should be a health warning attached to the film by Dylan Richards.

Owen was just 24 when he died in early November 1980, a month later Pintor retained his title in Las Vegas. There is a beautiful statue of Johnny Owen, Welsh, British, Commonwealth and European bantamweight champion in Merthyr Tydfil. It was 37 years ago this week.
 

Lunny

Shadowboxer's Nonsense Football Lottery Champ 2021
Staff member
Lupe Pintor vs Johnny Owen - 19-09-1980 WBC bantamweight world title


View attachment 24557


"
The tragic tale of Johnny Owen and how it left a scar over Mexican boxing

Owen was Welsh, British, Commonwealth and European champion when he travelled to Los Angeles to try to add the world title

Steve Bunce@bigdaddybunce
Monday 06 November 2017 13:19

View attachment 24558


Johnny Owen once asked his trainer not to put any cream over or cover a slight abrasion on his cheek after a British title fight. “It shows I’m a boxer,” he said.
Owen was the impossibly thin young Welshman, dubbed the Matchstick Man, the one with the large cartoon ears and a voice seldom heard above the distant buzz of birds, cars and men chattering.

“I’ve known Johnny since he was a baby and he’s never been out with a girl in his life. He’s dedicated to boxing, he doesn’t bother with girlfriends,” said Dai Gardiner, Owen’s manager, in 1978. It was a dedication with some glory away from any glitz.

In early September 1980 Owen arrived, with his devoted father Dick, a man of seemingly endless love for his son, in California for a world title fight against Lupe Pintor. They shared a room at the Gala Motor Hotel in a part of Los Angeles that only the brave, the homeless, the addicted and hopeful from Merthyr Tydfil ever knew.


Pintor was a Mexican idol at the Olympic Auditorium in a part of Los Angeles known as Little Mexico and his bantamweight world title fight with Owen was sold out, possibly packed with a few thousand extra on the night. When Owen arrived at the venue riot police were prowling, a rancid atmosphere of intimidation and hate was the backdrop.

In Owen’s changing room the chants of “Lupe, Lupe, Lupe” were rattling the furniture. Owen was the calmest man in the room, which is often the case in big fights. A year earlier Owen had fought 15 rounds in a bullring in Spain against a Spanish boxer who had failed the weight and was still allowed to box for the European title. The Seventies and Eighties are packed with abuses against travelling British boxers. On that night in Spain Owen lost a disgraceful decision and had to face a vicious mob; the local police had assaulted the assigned British Boxing Board of Control official and then placed him under armed guard at ringside. In the ring the Spanish boxer had a substance openly smeared on his gloves and this temporarily blinded Owen. It was harsh, but ideal preparation for Little Mexico.

View attachment 24559

In the filthy changing room at the Olympic Auditorium the wait for the call to the ring continued. “Johnny had no nerves at all and I was a very proud man,” said Dick. The walk to the ring was not a pantomime of nastiness and served as a violent warning for what would happen at the end of the fight. Pintor, by the way, was then and remains a Mexican idol.


Owen was trailing on all three scorecards in the fifteen-round fight when the bell for twelfth sounded. The canvas was splattered with blood, Owen had been swallowing his own blood since round five from a cut inside his bottom lip, dropped heavily in round nine and sent crashing twice more to the sodden canvas in round twelve. The final knockdown is arguably the single most disturbing image in British boxing history; I have watched it for you and listened to the men that were there talking about it. It will never leave you if you watch it.

Poor Johnny was out cold on the canvas, folded over his legs at first like a butchered giraffe. There was an ancient stretcher, no resuscitation equipment and somebody tried smelling salts. His body was placed like a sacrifice on the stretcher with tender care by his father and others in the corner, and then they faced a gauntlet with their silent and still boy. The men carrying the stretcher were abused, had their pockets picked, were hit, kicked and had urine in beer cups thrown over them. They screamed back in hate, carried the kid and made it through to the ambulance.
The body of Johnny Owen was first operated on at the Lutheran Hospital on Hope Street at 11:30pm on 19 September and it took four hours to scrape away the clot on his brain. The twilight wait, a dreadful game of silence, teary visitors, doctors without salvation in their words and days holding the boxer’s hand during the depth of a coma dragged on and on. Owen’s mother, Edith, arrived two days later and she sat with Dick in pitiful watch over their son for nearly two months.

There were scares, few positive signs and boxing continued; Pintor was back in Mexico City and suffering. “He told me he cried all the time,” Dick said in 2002 after an extraordinary film was made, bringing the father and a broken fighter together. There should be a health warning attached to the film by Dylan Richards.

Owen was just 24 when he died in early November 1980, a month later Pintor retained his title in Las Vegas. There is a beautiful statue of Johnny Owen, Welsh, British, Commonwealth and European bantamweight champion in Merthyr Tydfil. It was 37 years ago this week.
Bunce>>>>
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Bunce>>>>

If I remember correctly, the pieces I quoted for Watson and Gman in the middleweight thread were both from Bunce to.

Had to give full credit and not just copy and past his work like I do with most things I share here.
 

Lunny

Shadowboxer's Nonsense Football Lottery Champ 2021
Staff member
If I remember correctly, the pieces I quoted for Watson and Gman in the middleweight thread were both from Bunce to.

Had to give full credit and not just copy and past his work like I do with most things I share here.

I love the guy, even if he occasionally gets on my tits.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
Country Flag
Scotland
Lupe Pintor vs Johnny Owen - 19-09-1980 WBC bantamweight world title


View attachment 24557


"
The tragic tale of Johnny Owen and how it left a scar over Mexican boxing

Owen was Welsh, British, Commonwealth and European champion when he travelled to Los Angeles to try to add the world title

Steve Bunce@bigdaddybunce
Monday 06 November 2017 13:19

View attachment 24558


Johnny Owen once asked his trainer not to put any cream over or cover a slight abrasion on his cheek after a British title fight. “It shows I’m a boxer,” he said.
Owen was the impossibly thin young Welshman, dubbed the Matchstick Man, the one with the large cartoon ears and a voice seldom heard above the distant buzz of birds, cars and men chattering.

“I’ve known Johnny since he was a baby and he’s never been out with a girl in his life. He’s dedicated to boxing, he doesn’t bother with girlfriends,” said Dai Gardiner, Owen’s manager, in 1978. It was a dedication with some glory away from any glitz.

In early September 1980 Owen arrived, with his devoted father Dick, a man of seemingly endless love for his son, in California for a world title fight against Lupe Pintor. They shared a room at the Gala Motor Hotel in a part of Los Angeles that only the brave, the homeless, the addicted and hopeful from Merthyr Tydfil ever knew.


Pintor was a Mexican idol at the Olympic Auditorium in a part of Los Angeles known as Little Mexico and his bantamweight world title fight with Owen was sold out, possibly packed with a few thousand extra on the night. When Owen arrived at the venue riot police were prowling, a rancid atmosphere of intimidation and hate was the backdrop.

In Owen’s changing room the chants of “Lupe, Lupe, Lupe” were rattling the furniture. Owen was the calmest man in the room, which is often the case in big fights. A year earlier Owen had fought 15 rounds in a bullring in Spain against a Spanish boxer who had failed the weight and was still allowed to box for the European title. The Seventies and Eighties are packed with abuses against travelling British boxers. On that night in Spain Owen lost a disgraceful decision and had to face a vicious mob; the local police had assaulted the assigned British Boxing Board of Control official and then placed him under armed guard at ringside. In the ring the Spanish boxer had a substance openly smeared on his gloves and this temporarily blinded Owen. It was harsh, but ideal preparation for Little Mexico.

View attachment 24559

In the filthy changing room at the Olympic Auditorium the wait for the call to the ring continued. “Johnny had no nerves at all and I was a very proud man,” said Dick. The walk to the ring was not a pantomime of nastiness and served as a violent warning for what would happen at the end of the fight. Pintor, by the way, was then and remains a Mexican idol.


Owen was trailing on all three scorecards in the fifteen-round fight when the bell for twelfth sounded. The canvas was splattered with blood, Owen had been swallowing his own blood since round five from a cut inside his bottom lip, dropped heavily in round nine and sent crashing twice more to the sodden canvas in round twelve. The final knockdown is arguably the single most disturbing image in British boxing history; I have watched it for you and listened to the men that were there talking about it. It will never leave you if you watch it.

Poor Johnny was out cold on the canvas, folded over his legs at first like a butchered giraffe. There was an ancient stretcher, no resuscitation equipment and somebody tried smelling salts. His body was placed like a sacrifice on the stretcher with tender care by his father and others in the corner, and then they faced a gauntlet with their silent and still boy. The men carrying the stretcher were abused, had their pockets picked, were hit, kicked and had urine in beer cups thrown over them. They screamed back in hate, carried the kid and made it through to the ambulance.
The body of Johnny Owen was first operated on at the Lutheran Hospital on Hope Street at 11:30pm on 19 September and it took four hours to scrape away the clot on his brain. The twilight wait, a dreadful game of silence, teary visitors, doctors without salvation in their words and days holding the boxer’s hand during the depth of a coma dragged on and on. Owen’s mother, Edith, arrived two days later and she sat with Dick in pitiful watch over their son for nearly two months.

There were scares, few positive signs and boxing continued; Pintor was back in Mexico City and suffering. “He told me he cried all the time,” Dick said in 2002 after an extraordinary film was made, bringing the father and a broken fighter together. There should be a health warning attached to the film by Dylan Richards.

Owen was just 24 when he died in early November 1980, a month later Pintor retained his title in Las Vegas. There is a beautiful statue of Johnny Owen, Welsh, British, Commonwealth and European bantamweight champion in Merthyr Tydfil. It was 37 years ago this week.

1. 9-10 Owen. Didn't see that coming, Owen came out swinging, gave up his reach advantage and decided to show Pintor he was willing to trade inside. Pintor probably got the harder shots with a few left hook and body shots but Owen earned the point there.

2. 9-10 Owen. Setting an absolutely frenetic pace here, leaning in and throwing relentless shots. Pintor again with the more telling blows but Owen must be landing at least double the number.

3. 9-10 Owen. Having watched 2 fights of Owen boxing tidily it is surprisimg to see him brawl like this. It's ugly and scrappy but as long as his engine lasts, it's working

4. 10-9 Pintor. You could have gave Johnny that on raw aggression and output again. But Pintor landed some quality there, good left hooks timed between Owens flurries inside. But the punch that worked best was a right hand from outside, Owen needs to mix up how he starts his attack because Pintor is coming in over his jab every time

5. 9-10 Owen. More intense action, with Johnny just throwing and landing too many shots not to give him it. Pintor might make you think about your card as he has the big edge in power but his shots bounce off Owen. For a man so thin, the commentators are amazed at his toughness, never flinching to big shots upstairs or down.

6. 9-10 Owen. Pintor has been cut over both eyes from the second round and they open each round, must be hellish with two cuts faced with this torrent of punches, occasional elbows and Owen leaning in with head and shoulders. Owen bleeding from the mouth two. Wild fight, Mexican must be loving this.

7. 10-9 Pintor. First round fought mainly at distance and Owen uses his long jab but it's no deterrent for Pintor who has fantastic timing. Two cracking right hands may have bounced off Owen and inspired him to briefly flurry again but that type of shot was the highlight of the round.

8. 10-9 Pintor. Very close. Owen started fast again leaning in again and catching most of the return fire on the elbows. But he slowed as the round went on. Not sure how much Pintor landed at times but he definitely took control after the first minute to make it anvery tough one to call.

9. 10-8 Pintor. Think I had him narrowly ahead, in a round similar to the previous couple, when Pintor smashes him with a thudding right that sends him to the canvas, he looks ok when he gets up but Pintor launches a hellacious right when he restarts and Owen is lucky there was only 10 seconds left in the round.

10. 10-9 Pintor. Big effort from Owen but Pintor nearly matches his output and stings him with a lot of good shots. Loading up some huge right hands, a good few get through, particularly successful with the left to the body then right over the top

11. 10-9 Pintor, he isn't missing with much now. Owen tries to put it on him a couple times but he's tired in there. As the commentary point out, Pintor has had his best success at distance but he gets some excellent uppercuts in on the inside he Johnny too.

12. KO Pintor. Johnny possibly having his best round in the last few, scoring a little better from distance and going to work inside a couple times. Pintor starts it with a short right upper cut inside, shortly after a quick left hook/right hook drop Johnny. He gets up looking unsteady, Pintor lands a coouple, then a left, left right drop him flat on his back. Johnny's corner rush in to help while some of Pintors supporters storm the ring too.
105-103 Pintor going into the 12th round.

The footage goes to an advert break as he's carried out of the ring before briefly returning then cutting back to the start of the fight

RIP Johnny Owen
 
I love the guy, even if he occasionally gets on my tits.
I think he can be a bit lacking in tact at times Lunny. But for knowledge and being funny he's on his own. Not many of these pundits Id like to sit in a pub with but he's definitely one.
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Lupe Pintor vs Jovito Renfigo WBC 26.07.1981
Lupe had a defence before this against Jose Felix Uziga, a relatively lowly ranked Argentine that took Pintor the distance. Lupe won a fairly wide UD


Lupe Pintor 118 lbs beat Jovito Rengifo 117 lbs by TKO at 1:21 in round 8 of 15
Notes
  • Fight was televised live on CBS.
  • Pintor received $65,000 and Rengifo received $5,000. (Reading Eagle, p.21 7/27/81).
 

Davie

**2020 OTH Poster of the Year**
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Lupe Pintor vs Alberto Davila 19.12.1980


Lupe Pintor 118 lbs beat Alberto Davila 119 lbs by MD in round 15 of 15

1. 9-10 Davila. Pintor real does take his time to get started, not just in terms of tempo but finding his range, he gets better and better as his opponent slows. The commentator in the Owen fight questioned his stamina but for me he's grown into a couple of the fights I've watched and he needs to get into this one. Davila busier and more accurate.

2. 9-10 Davila good round, pace picking up a little. Davila edging the first two minutes but stealing the third impressively. Pintor knows one direction and that's forward, Davila willing to fight going backwards and forwards and it's when he springs in and lands short sharp burst of punches he looks most impressive.

3. 9-10 Davila. Pintor scoring some good thudding single shots, but it's Davila's clean combination punching that sets him apart in this round. He almost floors Pintor late with a right cross but takes his time after and wisely so as Pintor gets back on the front foot and throws a couple dangerous looking shots.

4. 10-9 Pintor. Davila threw less punches here. Pintor loads up a lot and lacks a bit of subtlety but when he lands he really lands. late on he scores a left uppercut, right cross followed by a left hook right uppercut, really good shots

5. 9-10 Davila, Pintor started well, scoring some decent shots in this one, mostly single shots though, Davila picked up the pace as the round progressed, getting off first but scoring quick compact jolting hooks that don't give Pintor the chance to counter in between

6 9-10 Davila, cracking round with them standing toe to toe swinging the whole round. Davila slightly busier, slightly more accurate and with the tighter defence. But Pintor is more powerful and seemingly made of stone.

7. 10-9 Pintor, very close round, both scoring hard shots, every time one puts a few together, you feel the momentum is changing, before it swings back, that kind of round. More meat in Pintors shots though

8. 10-9 Pintor, he landed more over the 3 minutes and when he does that it's easy to score as Pintor doesn't throw any of the light fast shots Davila lets go, everything launched with bad intentions. The uppercut to the body followed by another to the head a good combination that lands a few times this round

9. 10-9 Pintor, similar pattern to last round, Pintor ahead still in a toe to toe battle. He landed a few ferocious right hands through that round. I spoke of Pintors toughness, Davila has walked through some incredible shots here

10. 10-9 Pintor. This is a great fight, Pintor getting what he wants here, close range, the pace has come out of Davila's work so Pintor can bang away at that steady pace. He rolls side to side tearing in hooks, he transfers his bodyweight so effectively and keeps those hooks compact to deliver power effectively

11. 10-9 Pintor, another real give and take round with the slight edge in quality to Pintor. But Davila landed one cracking right hand that stunned Pintor. Close to scoring it 10-10

12. 10-9 Pintor. He just gets stronger and stronger as the fight goes on, unrelenting power shots and Davila can do less and less about them.

13. 10-9 Pintor, more of the same here, I like Pintor when he throws in combination, he's quite creative when he gets going, varying up angles and punch combinations.

14. 10-9 Pintor. Davila starts off missing a bit with arm weary shots, they slow to a near standstill halfway, Pintor, already comfortably ahead just accelerates from there and makes a concerted effort to stop him. Not quite but Davila looks a broken man now.

15. 10-9 Pintor. Alberto Davila looks frsher through this round than I expected and made a good account of himself in the final round but Lupe Pintor is some machine, he really is, anyone who questioned his gas tank is mental, he looks like he could do this for another 15 rounds. So strong, still working at a solid pace and every shot thrown with force and authority. He looks a very worthy winner in a fight that looked like it might be a real struggle early on.

115-110 Pintor.

It's crazy how the 15 round distance really changes the mathematics of a distance fight. No matter how many of these I've watched I'm programmed now to think of fights in terms of a 12 rounder and it always seems absurd seeing guys like this come out and give away 5 rounds early doors. But Pintor gave a masterclass in pacing a 15 round bout here. It helps that he has such natural power and a chin made of titanium of course, but he has such confidence in his ability to keep on trucking.
Sandoval, Owen and now Davila showed you can certainly take rounds off him with the right game plan, but if that game plan relies on a high output or putting a dent in this guy, you are either going to need superhuman stamina or a punch like a sledgehammer to put a dent in this guy. Once you tire he looks a different fighter, early on he's content to miss but as the target becomes more static, he looks such a polished puncher.
I think an elite boxer with a solid mandible could probably school Pintor, as he does just steadily go about his work, seldom really going through the gears unless he has you visibly hurt and he is no master technician. But against the guys I've watched he is so strong he takes some beating.
 
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